Dorsky Museum receives gift of Warhol prints from Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts

Flowers, 1970, screenprint, extra, out of edition. Designated for research and educational purposes only. © The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc.

Flowers, 1970, screenprint, extra, out of edition. Designated for research and educational purposes only. © The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc.

The Samuel Dorsky Museum of Art at the State University of New York at New Paltz is pleased to announce the receipt of the following six prints from the Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts:

  • Flowers, 1970
    Silkscreen on paper, 38 x 38 inches
  • Ladies and Gentlemen, 1975
    Screenprint on Arches paper, 43-3/4 x 29 inches
  • Fiesta Pig, 1979
    Screenprint on Arches paper, 21 1/2 x 30 1/2 inches
  • Mildred Scheel, 1980
    Screenprint on paper, 30 1/2 x 43 inches
  • Pete Rose, 1985
    Screenprint on Lenox Museum board, 39-3/8 x 31 1/2 inches
  • Sitting Bull, 1986
    Screenprint on Lenox Museum board, 36 x 36 inches

The brightly colored prints, all in Warhol’s recognizable style, depict a range of subjects, from fashionable portraits to popular culture and will be exhibited in a future exhibition at The Dorsky. The prints are original prints by Warhol that are outside the published edition and the published trial proof edition and are dedicated to research and educational purposes. They represent a second gift of Warhol’s work to organizations that participated in the Andy Warhol Photographic Legacy Program launched in 2007 in celebration of the Foundation’s 20th Anniversary.

About the Andy Warhol Photographic Legacy Program
The Andy Warhol Photographic Legacy Program donated over 28,500 photographs by Warhol to educational institutions across the United States. More than 180 college and university museums, galleries and art collections throughout the nation participated in the program, each receiving a curated selection of original Polaroid photographs and gelatin silver prints. The portraits, celebrity snapshots, couples, nudes, painting ideas, party photos, still lifes, and outdoor scenes that make up each selection demonstrate the range of Warhol’s aesthetic interests and the reach of his curious and far-roaming eye.

The aim of the Photographic Legacy Program was to provide greater access to Warhol’s work and process, and to enable a wide range of individuals from communities and institutions across the country to view and study this important body of work.

The Dorsky’s initial gift of 151 photographs was presented to the public in an exhibition entitled Andy Warhol: Private and Public in 151 Photographs. On display in the museum’s Sara Bedrick Gallery from April 10–September 26, 2010, this exhibition explored the interconnections between the private and public in the Warhol’s work. An accompanying catalogue included original research by the students in the SUNY New Paltz spring 2009 course, “Warhol Photographic Legacy Project,” taught by Professor Reva Wolf. The concept for the exhibition was developed by the students in this course, together with students in the spring 2009 “Museum Studies” course taught by Dorsky Museum Curator BriaMuse Wallace.

About the Museum
The Samuel Dorsky Museum of Art, located at SUNY New Paltz, is fast gaining wide recognition as the premier public showplace for exhibition, education, and cultural scholarship about the Hudson Valley region’s art and artists from yesterday and today. With more than 9,000 square feet of exhibition space distributed over six galleries, the Dorsky Museum is one of the largest museums within the SUNY system. The Dorsky was officially dedicated on Oct. 20, 2001. Since then it has presented over one hundred exhibitions, including commissions, collection-based projects, and in-depth studies of artists including Robert Morris, Alice Neel, Judy Pfaff, and Carolee Schneemann.

For more information about The Dorsky Museum, as well as detailed information about the above exhibitions and their related programs, visit www.newpaltz.edu/museum, or call (845) 257-3844. Museum Hours: Wednesday—Sunday: 11 a.m. – 5 p.m.
 (closed Mondays, Tuesdays, holidays and college intersessions)
.