February 2018 Newsletter

WHAT’S NEW? SUNY New Paltz Parents Newsletter

PEER-TO-PEER ACADEMIC SUPPORT SERVICES AVAILABLE IN THE CENTER FOR STUDENT SUCCESS
Students interested in scheduling an appointment with a trained peer learning Facilitator – such as an academic coach, subject tutor, or writing consultant – can make an appointment online through my.newpaltz.edu/css.

Located in Old Main B106, the Center for Student Success provides the following support services and resources:
Peer Academic Success Coaching
In 30 minute, one-on-one sessions, CSS student leaders are equipped to help peers:

o   Develop SMART academic goals,
o
   Learn tactics for improved time management
o
   Acquire and apply new study strategies and academic approaches
o
   Identify their personal learning style
o
   And more!

The Center for Student Success also offers Subject Tutoring and the Writers’ Studio in addition to STAR-NY Online Tutoring.

STUDENT OPINION SURVEY
On Tuesday, February 13, undergrads will receive an e-mail with the subject “Student Opinion Survey” from the Office of Institutional Research.  This is an opportunity for your student to provide valuable and confidential feedback on their New Paltz experience, from academics to campus life outside the classroom. Please encourage your student to take a few minutes to fill out this survey with their honest opinions. 

NEW PALTZ IN THE NEWS
COLLEGE WILL CONFER HONORARY DEGREES ON JANUS ADAMS, JIM OTTAWAY AT COMMENCEMENT 2018

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BIOLOGY PROFESSOR FEATURED ON ACADEMIC MINUTE
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MFA ALUMNA GETTING INTERNATIONAL EXPOSURE IN GALLERIES AND PRINT
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RESIDENCE HALLS GO HEAD-TO-HEAD AS RECYCLEMANIA RETURNS
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MODERN SPACES AND SOLAR SYSTEM HIGHLIGHT SPRING 2018 CONSTRUCTION NEWS
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2017 ECONOMIC IMPACT STATEMENT
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ARTICLE OF THE MONTH
Leadership Opportunities for Your Student
Already underway, and throughout every spring semester, the campus swells with activities that launch application processes for various positions on campus. For example, if you attended Orientation in the summer, you are quite familiar with Orientation Leaders/Peer Mentors (OL’s), who work full-time on campus for 8 weeks in the summer and part-time throughout the following school year. For most of you, your student lives on campus, so you are familiar with Resident Assistants (RA’s) who live on each floor and assist students with issues or requests. There are a myriad of leadership opportunities like these (that will start in the summer or next fall) that your student can begin applying for now, including Student Activities Managers, Resident Assistants, and Admissions Crew.

In addition, the Career Resource Center sponsors a Wednesday Workshop series free of charge that offers over a dozen different sessions to help your student prepare for volunteer and paid opportunities on and off campus. From writing covers letters and resumes – to readying their interviewing skills – these free workshops are available on a ‘just show up’ basis with no advance sign up required.  The Career Resource Center also sends a weekly electronic newsletter to all students to share events, workshops, scholarships, and anything else that is career related.  To view the newsletter, click here: http://hawksites.newpaltz.edu/careers/

An additional event that is a must for any student thinking about ways they can ‘jump start’ their future is the Networking Fair for Jobs & Internships.  On March 14th, the fair will take place on campus for students interested in looking for a summer job, volunteer opportunity, or to speak to potential employers about what they can do to prepare themselves to be marketable in a given organization or corporation.

UPCOMING EVENTS FOR YOUR STUDENT
Wednesday Workshops

Student Activities & Union Services Spring Programming Series

Saturday Movie Night Series

January 2018 Newsletter

WHAT’S NEW? SUNY New Paltz Parents Newsletter

SPRING ACADEMIC CALENDAR DATES: WHEN CLASSES ARE NOT IN SESSION
Spring Break takes place in March, with classes ending the evening of Friday, March 16th and resuming on the morning of Monday, March 26th.  Most Residence Halls shut down for this break and students must vacate their hall by Saturday morning at 10 a.m. on March 17th and can return after 10 a.m. on Sunday, March 25th. (This DOES NOT include the following 10-month halls: Bouton, Crispell, Deyo, Dubois, and Gage.) Residence Halls are locked during this period, however students are still encouraged to take valuables with them during their break (e.g. laptops, jewelry, cash, passport, ID’s, medications, etc.)

Note: Classes are not in session for President’s Day Monday, February 19th.  In March, classes after 3 p.m. on Friday, March 30th are not in session.

NEW PALTZ IN THE NEWS
SUNY NEW PALTZ 2017 YEAR IN REVIEW
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NEW PALTZ EARNS SPOT ON KIPLINGER’S “BEST COLLEGE VALUES” LIST
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DIV. OF ENGINEERING PROGRAMS WINS EQUIPMENT GRANT TO FUND NATURAL FIBER RESEARCH
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ESPN JOURNALIST KATE FAGAN TALKS MENTAL HEALTH WITH NEW PALTZ STUDENT ATHLETES
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WINNINGEST WOMEN’S BASKETBALL COACH IN NEW PALTZ HISTORY NOTCHES 200TH VICTORY
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THEATRE PROFESSOR PREPS FOR ROLE AS 2018 WINTER OLYMPICS SOUND DESIGNER
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ARTICLE OF THE MONTH
What Do Fraternities and Sororities Have to Offer?

The Fraternities and Sororities at SUNY New Paltz strive to uphold their founding values of scholarship, service, leadership, and brotherhood/sisterhood on a daily basis.  Students in our Fraternity and Sorority community gain a wide range of benefits, including achieving successful interpersonal relationships, communication skills, governance representation, community service and volunteerism, and a group camaraderie established between peers locally, regionally and nationally. We have a unique Fraternity and Sorority Life program on campus serving the needs of our diverse student population. About 300 students (4% of the undergraduate population) are actively involved in Fraternities and Sororities.  Our members make life-long friends, and appreciate feeling they are part of a family while away from home.

Is My Student Eligible to Join?
First and foremost, it’s important that a student do his/her homework before joining a Fraternity or Sorority. Our campus has 24 different organizations to choose from, and with membership comes a lifetime affiliation to the organization. Each chapter’s New Member Education Process is approved by the Office of Student Activities and Union Services and the group’s inter/national office to ensure that it is hazing-free and supportive of a student’s academic priorities. First-year students are eligible to become New Members of a Fraternity or Sorority during their second semester, with 12 credits completed and at least a 2.5 cumulative Grade Point Average. Before your student joins an organization, verify that it is a recognized Fraternity or Sorority on our campus (www.newpaltz.edu/saus).

What’s the Difference Between Recognized and Unrecognized Organizations?
A “recognized” Fraternity or Sorority is an organization that the college supports and has helped develop and manage. All recognized fraternities and sororities have worked hard to earn their official status. These organizations have the privilege of using college facilities and equipment, sponsoring information tables, posting and hanging flyers, holding meetings and/or programs on campus, having an Advisor, inducting new members who will be recognized by the college, and participating in campus functions such as Meet the Greeks. All of the organizations that are recognized by the college follow our no hazing policy during New Member Education. This policy ensures that at no time will a student’s safety and health be at risk. An “unrecognized” organization is one which chooses to exist “off campus,” and has no relationship with SUNY New Paltz.  An unrecognized group does not follow college policies and regulations. These organizations are not permitted to use college facilities, post flyers nor have any of the privileges recognized organizations have earned.

It is important to understand that if a student chooses to become a part of an unrecognized organization, he/she will never be recognized by the college and sometimes by the national board as an official member of that fraternity or sorority. That student will never be able to put his/her fraternity/sorority experience on their Co-Curricular Transcript.  Unrecognized organizations are not monitored by the college; students who choose to affiliate may potentially endanger their safety. Therefore, be sure to verify the status of an organization with Student Activities and Unions Services before your student begins a New Member Education Program.

How Can I Get More Information?
Fraternity and Sorority Life at SUNY New Paltz is managed through the Office of Student Activities and Union Services. Their website (www.newpaltz.edu/saus) contains helpful information to acclimate you to our exciting Fraternity and Sorority Life Community. Please feel free to contact the Assistant Director, Emily Bazinet, at bazinete@newpaltz.edu or 845-257-3025 with questions or concerns.

UPCOMING EVENTS FOR YOUR STUDENT
Welcome Back Weekend 2018

December 2017 Newsletter

WHAT’S NEW? SUNY New Paltz Parents Newsletter

On behalf of the Division of Student Affairs, we send you our best wishes for a happy and healthy new year!

The December Academic Calendar has some key dates:
December 12-13 – Study Day/Make-Up Class Days
December 14 – Common Exam Day (Composition)
December 15-21 – Final Exams (note: exams do not follow the same schedule as your student’s class schedule)
December 22 – Residence Halls close at 10:00 a.m.

FALL 2017 FINAL EXAMS SCHEDULE
Click here to view your student’s final exams schedule: Fall 2017 Final Exams Schedule: December 15-21

IMPORTANT INFORMATION FOR SPRING 2018
Residence Halls
All residence halls on campus will re-open on Sunday, January 21, 2018 at 10:00 a.m. Students can move back into their room between 10:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m. and 8:30 p.m. – 10:30 p.m. on Sunday.  Meal Plans will be activated and Hasbrouck Dining Hall will be open for breakfast.

First Day of Classes
The official first day of spring semester classes is Monday, January 22, 2018.

Paying Your Bill
Bill payment arrangements can be done online at your student’s my.newpaltz.edu page. Your bill should be paid by the due date listed on your invoice in order to avoid late charges. If you have questions about your bill, the best way to contact the Office of Student Accounts is to e-mail them at stuacct@newpaltz.edu. Their phone number is (845) 257-3150.  www.newpaltz.edu/student_accounts

NEW PALTZ IN THE NEWS
SUNY NEW PALTZ NAMED A MILITARY FRIENDLY® SCHOOL FOR THIRD YEAR RUNNING
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NEW KYNCL SCHOLARSHIP WILL SUPPORT UNDERREPRESENTED STUDENTS IN COMPUTER SCIENCE & ENGINEERING
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THREE NEW PALTZ FILMS WIN BIG AT SUNYWIDE FILM FESTIVAL
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ALUMNA ESTABLISHES NEW FUND TO SUPPORT AUTISM SPECTRUM DISORDER PROGRAMS AT THE COLLEGE
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COLLEGE SHARES NEWS OF THE PASSING OF ALUMNUS AND FORMER CONGRESSMAN MAURICE HINCHEY
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ARTICLE OF THE MONTH
Home for Winter Break: A message from the Director of the Counseling Center

Congratulations! You have survived (along with your student) the first half of their first year in college. While for most of you it was relatively smooth sailing and for others a seemingly bumpy ride all the way to the end, in the final analysis with you in the background (and sometimes foreground) you made it through. They are returning home, totally exhausted (intellectually, psychologically and emotionally) from the inherent challenges and stress of the last 14 weeks all culminating in Final Exams. Therefore, at the point they arrive home, your primary task is to feed them their favorite home cooked meal and Please! Please! allow them to fall into a deep slumber until they run out of dreams to have.  It is likely that there is little you can do that is more important than that and that even includes a mad holiday shopping mall dash. Their body is in desperate need of restorative sleep.  It is probably to the family’s advantage that they sleep otherwise you may have to contend with a “short fuse” and highly irritable person.

  • Did you ask “What are your grades?” Most likely one of your top priorities is to find out the academic outcome—namely their final grades. Hopefully you curbed the urge to purge it out of them if they did not voluntarily share their final grades with you immediately. Give them some time and wait it out. After all, what are you going to do if the grades are not to your satisfaction? Why spoil the family climate as soon as they get home or in the car drive home from being picked up or holiday atmosphere? Those who did well—passed all their classes with C and above may be more inclined to disclose than those who were less successful.

Resist the need to interrogate and remember to exercise utmost patience and understanding when discussing final grades. Instead, remain non-judgmental and ask open-ended questions and praise/acknowledge their efforts and their strengths. This approach will go a long way for you and you will get more information from them as well as insight into what was going on with them. For example, “Taylor/Jamie, it looks like you did well in some of your classes but really struggled others… What do you think happened?” A typical response from your student to this question may be, “…I don’t know.”  Your response then would be, “…well, Taylor/Jamie, I know you were trying hard to balance all types of demands and I am proud of you for hanging in there… it will be helpful for you to think about that in case it happens again … at least, knowing that will help you manage whatever it was that made it difficult for you to get the grades that I am sure you wanted.” Be a good listener. Remember the first year (especially the first semester) in college can be very overwhelming even for the student who did exceptionally well in high school. Again remember just about everyone here at New Paltz did exceptionally well in high school, too. The performance bars are significantly higher now in addition to the complex social and cultural environment they have to simultaneously navigate.

  • Did say, “What do you mean I will do better next time?” It’s always good to minimize the opportunity of a big fight over grades. A long drawn out lecture about their performance is not going to accomplish anything after they seemingly just barely survived thirteen/fourteen weeks of four to five classes of lectures and sleepless night of completing or trying to catch up on assignments. Also, they are probably feeling both guilt and shame about their performance. They would simply respond either passively or angrily to you. Therefore, stating your concern and letting it go for the time being is amongst the best approach. Sometime toward the end of the break and just before they return to school for the second semester, revisit the performance issue with them by again acknowledging their apparent efforts and empathizing with their struggle. Example, “…Taylor/Jamie, I know you are concerned about your performance, I/we are too…I/we are proud of you and your hard work and hanging in there…I/we hope you have given some thought to the reasons for your performance and that you have a plan of how to manage the difficulties…I/we hope you will speak to your advisor, Orientation Leader (OL) or peer mentor about how to get the assistance that will help you to be much more successful in the Spring semester.” Again, speak your peace and keep it brief. Curb the urge to give a long lecture involving threats to pull them out of school or instilling guilt about the sacrifice being made or the bite of the family budget that tuition is eating up. All these and more can become weight bearing and another psychological block added to their psychological “worry plate.”
  • Responding to changes. You may have noticed a lot of changes in them. Some subtle and some very overt. Change in attitudes, belief, behavior, values and lifestyles. You may even find yourself questioning whether this is really the same person you dropped off to college just about five months ago. Well, if this is true for you, then consider that as evidence that your student is experiencing the challenges and benefits of the overall college experience. And, most importantly your financial investment is yielding huge dividend. Caution, be careful of your response. If whatever it is about them seems far-out or a bit over the top to you, then simply look them straight in the eye and say “…uhmm, Taylor/Jamie that is really interesting.” The goal here is to avoid being unnecessarily critical. Remember some of these changes may be temporary and they will modify and adjust as they go through their developmental processes.
  • Say what? Asking vs.Telling. Excuse them if they seem not to be as respectful as they were before. Remember they have not had to answer to the tune of “yes/no mom/dad.” For the past five months they have been living primarily in the company of their peers and have developed various special communication patterns. In their newly found independence they have not had to ask for permission or approval to do most things. They have grown used to telling rather than asking and doing just about anything they want to do. Therefore, you will need to talk about how to communicate in a way that is respectful and validating of each other. Example, when Taylor/Jamie approaches you and says, “…mom/dad I need the car keys I am going out.” Then you can begin a dialogue by saying, “…Taylor/Jamie let’s find time to talk about how we can communicate about our expectations and needs from each other especially when you are home…” If you had a curfew before, then when they visit your home, consider renegotiating the time with them.
  • What do you mean you are not sure you want to be back at New Paltz? Confusion and ambivalence about returning to school or being away from home. By mid-January, most students start feeling eager to return to campus. They miss being in the company of their roommates and other friends. Most of all, they miss the sense of autonomy and personal freedom. Parents, family and friends, should try not to take this personally. It is not about you, it is about “Them.” Oftentimes, being home feels like compromising their newly found sense of self. College allows them to explore their horizon and express themselves in a validating way.

While the prospect of returning to campus seems exciting for most students, there are some students that struggle with the thought of returning. You may have long suspected that your student has been less than enthusiastic about New Paltz from the start and may want to transfer or take time out from college. These students are dredging the end of the break. Some are able to express such thoughts/feelings while others are fearful or even unable to do so. A typical response when you ask why they do not want to return is “…I don’t know, or I feel like I just don’t fit in…or… New Paltz is just not for me…” Most students in this category have done reasonably well academically but struggled with a combination of emotional, psychological and social/interpersonal challenges. If this is true for you and your student, it is important that you talk to them about it. Validate their concerns by saying “…Taylor/Jamie, you have kind of hinted about not wanting to return to school/New Paltz, I do not think I get the big picture or understand your reason for not wanting to return to New Paltz, can you help me/us understand from your perspective?  It may be overwhelming to talk about for all of you involved, especially if it is happening just before you are ready to head back to school. Take a deep breath, don’t panic. Say to them, “…Taylor/Jamie”…I hear what you are saying and I get it…so I will tell you what, let’s go back as planned and let’s arrange to talk with your resident hall director and someone from the counseling center and come up with a plan… if you follow through with the plan through late February and you are still feeling strongly about not wanting to be there, then we can talk more specifically about returning home…”  It is important that you remain clear about your expectations regarding adherence to the mutually agreed plan. You may also contact the Counseling Center and/or Academic Advising office for further consultation.

Enjoy your time with your now “Emerging Adult” Take pride and solace in their new and developing sense of personhood.  Be supportive. Your response to that change can either make them or break them.  Empower them to go forward and achieve their BEST SELVES.

Sincerely,
Dr. Gweneth M. Lloyd, Director, Psychological Counseling Center

UPCOMING EVENTS FOR YOUR STUDENT!
WELCOME BACK WEEKEND SOCIAL EVENTS BEING PLANNED
The 10th Annual Welcome Back Weekend will be held at the end of the first week of classes (Saturday, January 27 and Sunday, January 28). All first-year students will be notified in late January listing these upcoming social events.  The SUNY New Paltz Class of 2021 Facebook page will also highlight Welcome Back Weekend activities, as well.

November 2017 Newsletter

WHAT’S NEW? SUNY New Paltz Parent Newsletter

GETTING HOME FOR THANKSGIVING
The upcoming holiday weekend is just around the corner and although the residence halls stay open, many students wish to travel home for Thanksgiving Break (November 22 – November 26).  If needed, your student can travel by bus via Adirondack Trailways.  For other transportation options, you can visit our “Getting Your Student Home” site at: http://www.newpaltz.edu/current/gettinghome.html

NEW PALTZ IN THE NEWS
REGISTRATION OPEN FOR FULLY-ONLINE WINTER SESSION
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HUNDREDS OF STUDENT VOLUNTEERS HELP COMMUNITY AGENCIES ON MAKE A DIFFERENCE DAY
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SUNY CHANCELLOR JOINS COLLEGE TO BREAK GROUND ON STATE-OF-THE-ART ENGINEERING INNOVATION HUB
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LEADING ARCHITECTURE AND DESIGN MAGAZINE FEATURES WOOSTER HALL
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DESIGNING A BETTER BIN: CAMPUS UPGRADING TRASH AND RECYCLING RECEPTACLES
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WALK OF HONOR PAYS TRIBUTE TO CAMPUS COMMUNITY
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ARTICLE OF THE MONTH
NEW PREVENTION COORDINATOR LEADING COLLABORATIVE EFFORT TO REDUCE STUDENTS’ DRUG AND ALCOHOL USE
SUNY New Paltz has appointed Jaclyn Cirello as Prevention Coordinator, as part of a New York State grant-funded initiative to combat drug use and underage drinking among students.

Cirello’s appointment is made possible by a state Office of Alcoholism and Substance Abuse Services (OASAS) grant, announced by Governor Andrew Cuomo in May 2017, that provides funding for 20 SUNY and CUNY campuses for a period of five years. A significant portion of that funding went to creating the position of Prevention Coordinator.

Cirello brings extensive experience to this new role. She holds a Master’s degree in mental health counselling from Montclair State University and five years of clinical experience at an outpatient rehabilitation center. She also worked at a Louisiana group home for at-risk youth, during a two-year stint with Americorps.

Through this work Cirello has developed a strong sense of the importance of involving stakeholders throughout the community – including care providers, law enforcement, educators and families – in prevention efforts.

“It’s not just a one-person or one-organization effort,” she said. “I believe in the entire community coming together to help fight these issues. I’ve often found that everyone’s pretty much already working toward the same goals, so collaborating and sharing strategies just makes it that much more powerful.”

New Paltz’s Division of Student Affairs has long worked with regional partners to help prevent drug and alcohol abuse – the Tavern Owners Agreement established in 1999 stands as one noteworthy example – but the OASAS funding and Cirello’s appointment represent an opportunity to expand efforts in these areas.

“We have always done drug and alcohol prevention here at New Paltz, but this is the first time in recent memory that we’ve had someone dedicated solely to this issue, coordinating this work on campus and working with stakeholders in the region, and that’s really exciting,” said Linda Eaton, associate vice president for student affairs, who worked with with Director of Student Development Michelle Combs and retired Assistant to the President Raymond Schwarz to ensure New Paltz would qualify for this grant.

The grant-funded activities begin with a needs-assessment period, which includes a student survey and a partnership with the Counterdrug Task Force, a New York National Guard program that supports communities and law enforcement agencies in combating illicit drug activity through environmental strategies.

Once the results of the needs assessment are available, Cirello will with lead a campus and community-wide effort to develop educational, prevention and intervention strategies, helping reduce overall drug and alcohol use at New Paltz, while also emphasizing individualized care.

“Our prevention and intervention strategies with students can’t be one-size-fits-all,” she said, “so in developing systems to address this issue on campus, we want there to be enough flexibility to adapt to students’ individual needs.”

Students, faculty, staff and alumni interested in getting involved with this work are encouraged to contact Cirello at cirelloj@newpaltz.edu.

More about the OASAS initiative to fund abuse prevention programs at SUNY and CUNY campuses is available from SUNY.

UPCOMING EVENTS FOR YOUR STUDENT
Thursday, November 16 – Sunday, November 19
“A Midsummer Night’s Dream”
8:00 p.m. & 2:00 p.m. on 11/19, McKenna Theatre
$10 student tickets

Friday, November 17
Class of 2021 First-Year Friday: TBA Improv Comedy Workshop
9:00 p.m., Student Union 100 North

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October 2017 Newsletter

WHAT’S NEW? SUNY New Paltz Parent Newsletter

PARENT & FAMILY WEEKEND- Photo Album
Saturday, September 23, 2017
Click here to view the Parent & Family Weekend photo slideshow

NEW PALTZ IN THE NEWS
AS DISTINGUISHED SPEAKER, JANUS ADAMS ’67 SHARES NARRATIVE OF PERSONAL, LOCAL AND NATIONAL HISTORY

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WOOSTER HALL DRILL A SUCCESS, SAY CAMPUS OFFICERS AND EMERGENCY RESPONDERS
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MORE THAN 430 RETURN TO NEW PALTZ FOR ALUMNI REUNION 2017
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AT WOODSTOCK FILM FESTIVAL, NEW PALTZ STUDENTS STAR AS VIDEO PRODUCERS
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NEW PALTZ AGAIN NAMED ONE OF NATION’S GREENEST COLLEGES
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ARTICLE OF THE MONTH
Parents as Partners for Internship and Job Opportunities. Hire New Paltz!
Parents as partners can be a critical resource for assisting us with increasing the marketability of current students and new college graduates.  Pre-professional experiences, especially internships, look great on a resume.  Why are we stressing the importance of parents as partners? Consider the fact that you hope that your son or daughter will have a variety of opportunities to choose from including internships, summer jobs, and eventually full time employment.  With parents as our partners, we can increase the number and type of opportunities available to your student as well to all SUNY New Paltz students.  Here are some of the ways you can help:

Offer internships
An internship can help a student determine career direction, and it provides valuable real-world experience. Is there an established internship program at your company/organization? Even if your employer doesn’t currently have a formal internship program, is there the possibility of employing a student as an intern? For more information regarding how to develop and promote your  internships, please contact the Career Resource Center at careers@newpaltz.edu or 845-257-3265.

Post opportunities
If your organization has open positions, consider posting on HawkHire at https://newpaltz-csm.symplicity.com. Posting on HawkHire is free and the postings are accessible only to SUNY New Paltz students and alumni.

Serve as a Sophomore Shadow host
If you work in New York City, Long Island region, or the Hudson Valley, consider allowing a SUNY New Paltz sophomore to shadow you for one day during the winter break (between January 8 – 19, 2018). Details can be found at www.newpaltz.edu/careers/ssphost.html, and you can register at www.newpaltz.edu/careers/ssphostform.html.

Share your experience
We encourage students to conduct informational interviews with professionals working in their fields of interest as a way to research occupations and organizations. We host dozens of career events and programs each year from ‘Internship/Job Fairs’ to ‘Career Panels’ to ‘Experts from the Field’ Skype sessions and company site visits. If you have special interests or area of expertise and would like to discuss how you might contribute, please complete this form at http://www.newpaltz.edu/careers/partners.html and a staff member from the Career Resource Center will contact you.

Thank you for your continued interest in and support of SUNY New Paltz Students. If you have any questions or concerns, please do not hesitate to contact the Career Resource Center at careers@newpaltz.edu or 845-257-3265.

Mark McFadden
Director, Career Resource Center

 A message from the Student Health Service
Your student can avoid the flu by getting a flu shot at the Health Center’s free flu clinic.  Students can schedule their appointment by calling 845-257-3400.
Click here for the Student Health Service web site

Involvement Opportunities for Your Student
Wellness & Recreation offers a number of group exercise classes, club sports, intramurals, and outdoor pursuits that your student can participate in.

There are many student organizations that first-year students can join including Student Association recognized clubs, Hall Government, and the Residence Hall Student Association.

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September 2017 Newsletter

WHAT’S NEW? SUNY New Paltz Parent Newsletter

MOVING-IN DAY – What it looked like…
Thursday, August 24 turned out to be a beautiful day to welcome your students to New Paltz!  Many staff members and students were on hand to move-in new students and welcome family members to campus.
Click here for a Moving-In Day article & to view photos
moving-in-day-2016

MOVING-IN DAY – What it felt like…
The cartoon below may make you laugh, but to some extent the experiences depicted in the scenarios are usually true for the majority of parents. Since you dropped your student off for Orientation Part II, Welcome Week, and the first week of classes, they officially crossed the threshold to becoming college students. We hope you were able to get through your own “first week of college” as well. It’s an adjustment for everyone involved, so remember to give yourself permission to ride the waves of feelings that come with an “emptier nest.”  Those feelings are real and you are not alone in feeling them, so commiserate with other people you know who have children in college – it may help you feel better about what you are going through.
letting_go_cartoon

PARENT & FAMILY WEEKEND – September 23-24: RSVP ONLINE TODAY!
We are excited to invite you to a great weekend of events to choose from, and you can enjoy a visit even if you only come up for the day on Saturday!

Our headline entertainment is A Night of Comedy featuring Comic-Hypnotist Frank Santos Jr. and our own student vocal group Absolut A Cappella is the opening act. We have also chartered the Rip Van Winkle boat just for New Paltz families to enjoy a two–hour boat cruise on the Hudson.
Tickets are selling quickly, so go online and make your reservation today!

The entire invitation and registration form is online at: www.newpaltz.edu/parentsweekend
Please complete a registration form (online or via return mail) even if you do not plan to attend any of the paid events so that we can plan accordingly for the number of visitors coming to campus.  We encourage you to make reservations early as seating is limited at certain eventsOnline reservations are easy to complete and you can pay for paid events with your credit card.

If you choose to mail in your reservation, you can pay by check made out to “CAS 8230” and mail to:
Center for Student Development
SUNY New Paltz
Student Union 301
1 Hawk Drive
New Paltz, NY 12561

Not coming to a paid event? Sign-up anyway and stop by our registration table on the 2nd Floor of the Student Union from 9:30am-3:00pm to enter to win a great gift basket of New Paltz gear!

2017-2018 PARENT HANDBOOK & CALENDAR
The Parent Handbook & Calendar includes information such as important academic dates and deadlines, Midterm and Final Examination schedules, sporting events, and notes on days when classes are not being held due to holiday breaks. You can view the online version of the handbook/calendar on the www.newpaltz.edu/parents page.

GETTING HOME FOR FALL BREAK AND THANKSGIVING BREAK
Although the residence halls stay open for these holiday weekends, if your student chooses to go home for the four-day “Fall Break” weekend from October 7-10, and/or Thanksgiving Break (November 22 – November 26) they can travel by bus right from New Paltz.

ARTICLE OF THE MONTH
“Untying the Apron String: Tips for Letting Go”
Dr. Gweneth M. Lloyd, Director, Psychological Counseling Center

Chances are as you prepare to engage in the actual and final process of sending your child off to college, you will encounter a crescendo in your relationship like no other. It may be one that can be comforting as a few piano notes, loud as the bangs on a drum or as unpredictable rhythms of a musical composition. The struggle between parent and child to “let-go” of each other is a process that begins during labor and delivery and extends through the lifetime of the relationship and sometimes even well beyond that.

In our society it is socially sanctioned that somewhere between ages 18-21, the child-to-adult rites of passage begins. Colleges and universities have come to represent one of the experimental grounds for exploring and experiencing the tasks, activities, rights and responsibilities of becoming an adult. Parents have the breath-holding challenge of standing back and observing their child apply, test, evaluate and select the morals, values and standards that they have been ‘spoon-fed’ over the last seventeen to eighteen years. The physical departure of your child to college will come to represent one of the pivotal points in your relationship status with your child and likewise for your child too. Colleges and universities perceive and manage any enrolled student as an “adult” with all the rights, privileges, responsibilities, benefits and liabilities that such a status holds.

Strategies for working through “letting-go” process: Loosening the apron string
To maximize the growth of your now young “Adult-Child” it is necessary for you to manage your responses and interactions in a manner consistent with their newly acquired adult status. You start doing so by gradually changing your perception of them as a “child,” even when they behave as one. You will need to remind them that they are now young adults and that their decisions and actions carry consequences that may have positive or negative outcomes.

  • It is not unusual for them to call you and demand that you come and pick them up to return home. Transitioning to college can be very anxiety provoking. Talk to them about feelings, fears, and concerns. This is a time to refine your listening skills. Talk less and listen more. Listen with your ears and not your heart.  Be mindful of knowing when to “hold” your opinion, “fold” your opinion or “walk-away” with your opinion.  Partialize the problem by breaking it down and focus on one or two things at a time. Before ending the conversation, have an understanding of what action they will take by the time you talk again. Don’t take control of the situation unless it is life threatening or they have demonstrated that they have done everything possible to manage or solve the problem. It will be necessary for you to remember that in this new status role change, in some situations there will be nothing more you can do. As painful as it may be, you may even discover that the best you can do, is to do nothing. Remember, crisis provides an opportunity for change and change produces and enhances growth.
  • Gradual change in your perception will lead to your young “Adult-Child” assuming greater ownership for their life. This will mean in your role as parent, you are transitioning from commander and chief to “consultant”. You will need to squelch the urge to direct or control. Instead, be a good listener and redirect the decision back to them. Build their self-confidence by empathizing and reminding them of a similar time or situation which they managed by exercising good judgment and problem-solving skills. When they make a decision with an undesirable outcome, again, squelch the urge to say, “I told you so.” Instead, focus your response on talking about what they think can be done differently without commanding or controlling the process.
  • One of the roles of a consultant is to offer options. Try not to be the problem-solver but instead a resource director/facilitator. There is not one problem related to the student’s overall academic, social, psychological and physical success that a corresponding campus resource is not available to assist. For almost every conceivable problem a student may encounter, there is an established campus based resource office professionally staffed to assist the student. Therefore, in your role as a consultant-parent redirect them to the appropriate office for assistance. Keep the resource folder you received during orientation next to your bedside and/or in your work bag. Use it as your reference/resource guide. As you already know, the college website can also be very resourceful.
  • Establish clear and mutual expectations with your young “Adult-Child” about finance management, reasonable academic performance including communication of final grades, your visitation to campus and their visitation home centered on frequency of visits. Address these issues early on as they tend to be the general problem areas. It is not unusual that they may want to come home almost every weekend, especially if they are experiencing home-sickness or is involved in a dating relationship with someone at home. Certainly this behavior has the potential for limiting the kind of campus-based experience that they could have. The downtimes of weekends are opportunities for making connections with room-mates, suite-mates and others across campus. If this is a potential problem, talk about it and have a mutual understanding about the frequency of home visit trips.  You may consider limiting trips home to one weekend per month. As their campus residence is now home turf, resist the urge to do surprise visits. You may be more surprised than you want to be. Therefore tell them that you are considering visiting and give a time/day range. When you visit, resist the commander and chief role of firing one question after the other or commenting on what they look like. Be constructive in your communication especially about room condition, roommates and friends you will meet. Remember, your non-constructive comments can have lasting consequences.
  • Remember, a good consultant is always open, seeking consultation for themselves in order to effectively support and assist. As your “Adult-Child’s” personal consultant, the Psychological Counseling Center welcomes your call/ inquiry for assistance, especially in the psychological/emotional health and safety of your young “adult-child.”
  • Remember, your student lives in a supportive community of peers and countless professionals. Your student is “able” and “capable.”

UPCOMING EVENTS FOR YOUR STUDENT!
As described during Orientation, on an ongoing basis, there are a number of activities for your first-year student to do outside of the classroom.  First-Year Fridays are social events for first-year students where some of the Orientation Leader/Peer Mentors will be present.  To view Part 1 of the Fall 2017  “First-Year Fridays” schedule click the link below:
http://www.newpaltz.edu/studentdevelopment/fyf.html

The “Saturday Movie Night Series” events for the semester can also be viewed at the link below:
http://www.newpaltz.edu/studentdevelopment/snl.html

The Office of Student Activities and Union Services also sponsors large scale events promoted campus-wide every month.  In addition to these events, their office hosts annual programs every year.  To view these programs, click on the link below:
http://www.newpaltz.edu/saus/dept_programs.html

 

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May 2017 Newsletter

WHAT’S NEW?  SUNY New Paltz Parents Newsletter

NEW PALTZ IN THE NEWS
NEW PALTZ MAKES TOP 100 IN NATIONWIDE RANKING OF PUBLIC COLLEGES
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SUNY BOARD OF TRUSTEES APPOINTS KRISTINA M. JOHNSON AS 13TH SUNY CHANCELLOR
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FIRST MECHANICAL ENGINEERING GRADUATES TO WALK AT COMMENCEMENT 2017
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COLLEGE HOSTS RECORD 700+ JOB INTERVIEWS AT TEACHER RECRUITMENT DAY
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FACULTY ROCKERS & SPECIAL GUESTS RAISE $3,000 FOR STUDENT RETENTION FUND
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ARTICLE OF THE MONTH
The Big Countdown to the End of Their First Year!
Can you believe one year ago at this time you were planning for high school graduation, and very soon, your student will have already completed one year of college?  That year went fast!  Now it’s time for your student to write final papers, get ready for exams, and be reminded to pack up ALL of their belongings (if they live on campus) so that you can (hopefully) show up and move them out without having to pack everything up for them!  Remember- when they have completed their final exams for the semester they must check out with their R.A. who will do a room check, but the residence halls CLOSE on Saturday, May 20 at 10:00am, so your student must vacate with everything by that time.  Even if your student is returning to the same room in the fall, some rooms are painted and halls across campus have maintenance projects so your student cannot leave anything in the building.

Here’s a schedule at-a-glance for the remainder of the semester:
Wednesday, May 10 – Thursday, May 11: Study Day/Make-up Class Days
Monday, May 15 – Friday, May 19:
Final Exams
Friday, May 19: End of Spring 2017 semester
Saturday, May 20: Residence Halls close at 10:00am
Wednesday, May 24: Last day for faculty to submit final grades

(Remember: grades are NOT mailed; your student will see them online at my.newpaltz.edu as they are uploaded by each faculty member, course by course)

Fall 2017 Residence Hall Move-In Day – Sunday, August 27

UPCOMING EVENT FOR YOUR STUDENT
Sunday, May 7
End of Your First Year Celebration
4-6pm, Hasbrouck Quad

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April 2017 Newsletter

WHAT’S NEW?  SUNY New Paltz Parents Newsletter

WILL YOUR STUDENT BE LIVING ON CAMPUS NEXT FALL?
If your student lives on campus and plans to live on campus in the Fall, it’s time to submit the Advance Room Deposit (ARD) of $100.  The latest they can place an ARD is Monday, April 10th.  Your student should check their New Paltz e-mail account to find all the instructions for choosing their room.  Payment can be made via their my.newpaltz.edu page by clicking on the “Residence Life” link and selecting the Pay Advance Room Deposit option.

NEW PALTZ IN THE NEWS
ALUMNA JESSICA FAIETA, UN ASSISTANT SECRETARY-GENERAL, TO SPEAK AT SATURDAY UNDERGRADUATE COMMENCEMENT CEREMONY

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BANKER MICHAEL KEEGAN WILL BRING YEARS OF EXECUTIVE EXPERIENCE TO SUNDAY UNDERGRADUATE COMMENCEMENT ADDRESS
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WOMEN’S LEADERSHIP SUMMIT BRINGS ALUMNAE, PROFESSIONAL LEADERS TO CAMPUS
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FIVE NEW PALTZ STUDENTS BRING HOME SUNY CHANCELLOR’S AWARDS
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ARTICLE OF THE MONTH
Post-Midterm Support: What Can Parents Do?
As we enter the final stretch of the spring semester, parents may be wondering what they can do to ensure that their student completes their first year of college in the most successful fashion possible. Here are some questions to consider.

What are students dealing with right now?
More than likely, your students have already received their midterm grades.  This may cause some panic, anxiety, stress, or even serve as a wake-up call to their studying habits.  They may begin to realize that their high school last-minute up-all-night prep just doesn’t cut it in the University setting.  As a parent, you may feel helpless in these moments.  Finding the right balance of tough love and empathy can be a challenge.  My advice to you – suggest meeting with a Peer Academic Success Coach in the Center for Student Success.  By listening first and then offering a resource, as opposed to finding solutions to their problems or scolding them for their poor marks, students will see this as a non-threatening option for help.  This will also put them squarely in the driver’s seat to steer themselves into success.  By giving your student the control of their academic success, you empower them to make their own decision.  Remind them that no one reaches success alone, and neither should they!

What is the PASC program at the Center for Student Success?
The Center for Student Success is located in Old Main B106 and houses the College’s academic support programs, including Tutoring Services, Writer’s Studio, and the new Peer Academic Success Coach (PASC) program. The PASC program helps students refine their time management skills, identify and achieve SMART goals, apply strategies to study effectively, and identify campus resources designed to promote student learning and development.  The primary focus of the programs is the successful transition of first-year (freshman) and first-semester transfer students to the College’s academic life.  The PASC program is brand new and uses the latest research methods and best practices in the field.  The PASC program is one-on-one, peer-to-peer, free, and available from 9am-7pm Monday – Friday (students simply sign up online via my.newpaltz.edu).  Students who are thriving and want to continue thriving as well as student who are finding their success strategies, can equally benefit from our services.

Why is a PASC different than office hours?
Nothing can replace a face-to-face interaction with a professor.  Working with faculty members can be a great way to start the conversation about a specific course.  However, some students, particularly first-year students, may feel intimidated by their professors.  Additionally, students may be struggling with general academic skills rather than a specific subject-matter.  A PASC is a fully trained upperclassmen who can talk to your student on their level. A PASC is a student who has recently been through the transition and has learned to successfully navigate the academic terrain at SUNY New Paltz.  There is also an inherent trust that first year students have with upperclassmen that can prove to be impactful.  This kind of mentoring relationship can be a perfect place to learn skills and develop strategies for academic success.

What can a PASC help with?

  • Time management: Often first year students have difficulty with the autonomy associated with college academics and campus life. In addition, they have trouble prioritizing homework, studying, and of course, fun.  PASCs help students develop skills for personal time management.  Time for studying, extra-curriculars, and wellness are all important aspects of a college student’s experience, and our PACS are well versed in a variety of different time management strategies to help find balance.
  • Study Skills: First-year students have the tendency to hold onto unproductive study habits for far too long. College is a new level of rigor that requires a new level of study.  A PASC will help identify a student’s learning style and suggest methods of studying that best align with their style.
  • Goal Setting: How do you know when you get there if you don’t know where you’re going? All students have goals, but first year students often have difficulty articulating short-term and long-term goals that are realistic and attainable.  A PASC can help a student fully develop their goals and help identify methods to achieve them.
  • And more…: The wonderful framework of the program is that it is customizable and thus tailored to each individual student. The Center recognizes that students often are exploring more than one opportunity for growth and the PASCs are specially trained to find those strengths and use them to help tackle challenges.  Our mission is to facilitate student learning and student success, with any and all students who enter the Center.

Why is this the right time?
There is no better time than the present!  Midterm grades are just a starting point, but there are still many opportunities to grow from here.  Encourage your student to see a PASC and create a mid-semester academic success plan to reach their goals and complete the year on a productive and positive note.

And finally…
As a concluding suggestion, I would encourage you to convey your parental pride to your student as they complete their first year at SUNY New Paltz.  The first year of college serves as a rite-of-passage for many, and let’s recall that the traditional college years (ages 18-25) are also a time of profound developmental growth, marked by a complex process of identity- and other skills development processes, as students learn to manage and navigate a host of intellectual, personal, and social demands.

Once again, research in the field continues to demonstrate the vital relationship between parental support and their student’s personal and academic success. Your positive reinforcement could go a long way in supporting their development and success – more than you might currently imagine.

Dante Cantú is the director of the Center for Student Success at SUNY New Paltz. Mr. Cantú was recently recognized as an “Outstanding First-Year Advocate” by the National Resource Center for The First-Year Experience and Students in Transition.

Himali Pandya is the interim coordinator of holistic academic support programs in the Center for Student Success. With a rich background in the non-profit field, leadership development, and as a former assistant director of student activities, Ms. Pandya loves to meet students where they are, facilitate their growth through a strengths-based approach, and help students develop the skills to thrive in college and beyond.

UPCOMING EVENT
End of Your First-Year Celebration at the RHSA BBQ
4-6pm, Sunday, May 7 next to Hasbrouck Dining Hall
Free giveaways, raffle prizes, and refreshments!

 

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March 2017 Newsletter

WHAT’S NEW?  SUNY New Paltz Parents Newsletter

DEPOSIT DEADLINE FOR ARD (ADVANCE ROOM DEPOSIT) FOR FALL 2017
In order to secure on-campus housing, students who plan to live on campus will need to pay their $100 ARD before signing-up for a room.  If your student lives on campus, they received an e-mail notice from the Housing Coordinator on March 10th encouraging them to start thinking about whether or not they want to live on campus their second year.  An additional e-mail will be sent after spring break which will include detailed information regarding deadlines for choosing a housing location, whether it be “Same Hall, Same Room”, or moving to another location on campus. The latest your student can pay an ARD is Monday, April 10th. This can be done at any time via their my.newpaltz.edu page by clicking on the “Residence Life” link and selecting the Pay Advance Room Deposit option.

NEW PALTZ IN THE NEWS
DISTINGUISHED SPEAKER SERIES TO WELCOME ENVIRONMENTALIST ROBERT F. KENNEDY JR. BACK TO CAMPUS

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THE COLLEGE NAMES FIRST 40 UNDER FORTY ALUMNI HONOREES
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WOMEN’S BASKETBALL CROWNED SUNYAC CHAMPIONS, ADVANCE TO FIRST EVER D3 SWEET 16
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DISCOVERY PROGRAM BRINGS STUDENTS AND ALUMNI TOGETHER FOR INTERVIEWS, INSIGHT
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JOHN TURTURRO ’79 REFLECTS ON NEW PALTZ EXPERIENCE IN RECENT PODCAST WITH ALEX BALDWIN
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 ARTICLE OF THE MONTH
“Getting ready to have your student home for their (and your) first Spring Break”
by Robin Cohen-La Valle, Dean of Students

[Note: Spring Break takes place in March, with classes ending the evening of Friday, March 17th and resuming on the morning of Monday, March 27th. Most Residence Halls shut down for this break, whereby students must vacate their hall by Saturday morning, March 18th (10:00am) and can return after 10:00am on Sunday, March 26th. The halls are locked during this period, however students are still encouraged to take valuables with them during their break (e.g. laptops, jewelry, cash, passport, ID’s, medications, etc.]

Next to the winter recess, Spring Break is the longest break of the academic year for college students. When we did an informal survey of New Paltz students, 90% said that they were planning to go home and catch up on sleep, see old friends, do readings they have been assigned, work on term papers and projects, possibly work part-time at an old job, and start applying for summer jobs or internships. As you can see, it is a misconception that most college students get to go away to a warm beach somewhere and bask in the sun.

In the meantime, although you may look forward to seeing their face more, having them around the house full-time will change the pace of what it has been like without them for a semester and a half. So how does that affect the household’s equilibrium? Prepare yourself- It’s no surprise that they will look forward to home cooked meals and time shopping with you. However, they might not be ready for you to tell them when to get home after going out with old friends, since you haven’t been there to give curfews this year. Believe it or not, most likely they probably will not be happy that you expect them to pitch in with chores they never liked and haven’t done in a while. For example- if they live on campus, while at school they had to do their laundry, but it is not uncommon for a student to revert back to expecting that even their own chores will be taken care of by someone else while on Spring Break!

So how can you best prepare?

–  First, have realistic expectations. Anticipating a perfectly smooth, harmonious reunion without any disagreements will set you up for disappointment. If you bickered before, or your student wasn’t very forthcoming when it came to telling you what they were doing and feeling, be ready for the fact that they will have changed dramatically.

–  Have an adult conversation with your student the first day back home. Something like, “I know you are an adult now, so let’s talk about what your plans are for the week, what you’d like from me, and what I hope to expect from you…”

–  Choose select times to ask open ended questions of a stressful nature, as that will avoid you being perceived as if you’re ‘nagging’ them every day. For example, once or twice opening a conversation with: “So tell me what you’re thinking of doing this summer, and how I might help” vs. starting every day with, “When are you going to look for a job already, time’s running out!” will more likely keep communication open. Also, see if an aunt, uncle, or good family friend wants to broach these topics with your student. Sometimes questions coming from someone OTHER than a parent or guardian are not received with defensiveness. [I know my nieces and nephews respond VERY differently when I ask them something, even if their mom has asked them the very same question!]

–  Finally, enjoy the moments you have with them. Take the space you need to do your own thing, expect they will want a little space of their own, and enjoy the time you overlap.

GETTING HOME FOR SPRING BREAK REMINDER

For other options, you can also visit our “Getting Your Student Home” site at: http://www.newpaltz.edu/current/gettinghome.html

UPCOMING EVENTS
“SHADOW OF A GUNMAN” BY SEAN O’CASEY
8:00pm, Thursday, March 9 – Saturday, March 11
2:00pm, Sunday, March 12
$10 SUNY New Paltz Student Tickets
http://www.newpaltz.edu/theatre/

 

January/February 2017

WHAT’S NEW? SUNY New Paltz Parents Newsletter

SPRING ACADEMIC CALENDAR DATES WHEN CLASSES ARE NOT IN SESSION

Spring Break takes place in March, with classes ending the evening of Friday, March 17th and resuming on the morning of Monday, March 27th.  Most Residence Halls shut down for this break and students must vacate their hall by Saturday morning at 10 a.m. on March 18th and can return after 10 a.m. on Sunday, March 26th. (This DOES NOT include the following 10-month halls: Bouton, Crispell, Deyo, Dubois, and Gage.) Residence Halls are locked during this period, however students are still encouraged to take valuables with them during their break (e.g. laptops, jewelry, cash, passport, ID’s, medications, etc.)

Note: Classes are not in session for President’s Day Monday, February 20th.  In April, classes after 3 p.m. on Monday, April 10th are not in session and there are no classes on Tuesday, April 11th.  

NEW PALTZ IN THE NEWS
SUNY NEW PALTZ 2016 YEAR IN REVIEW

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FIRST GENERATION OF PEER ACADEMIC SUCCESS COACHES PREPS FOR SPRING ’17
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DORSKY MUSEUM MAKES HUFFPO LIST OF BEST COLLEGE ART AND HISTORY MUSEUMS
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SUNY NEW PALTZ AWARDED $1.4 MILLION FOR SUSTAINABLE ENERGY PROJECTS IN 2016
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SUNY NEW PALTZ EARNS MILITARY FRIENDLY® GOLD STATUS
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ARTICLE OF THE MONTH
Leadership Opportunities for Your Student
Beginning in the next few weeks, and throughout every spring semester, the campus swells with activities that launch application processes for various positions on campus. For example, if you attended Orientation in the summer, you are quite familiar with Orientation Leaders/Peer Mentors (OL’s), who work full-time on campus for 8 weeks in the summer and part-time throughout the following school year. For most of you, your student lives on campus, so you are familiar with Resident Assistants (RA’s) who live on each floor and assist students with issues or requests. There are a myriad of leadership opportunities like these (that will start in the summer or next fall) that your student can begin applying for now, including Student Activities Managers, Commuter Assistants, Resident Assistants, and Admissions Crew.  Wednesday, February 1st features a Student Club & Involvement Fair in the Student Union with over 150 organizations giving out information about how your student can get involved.

In addition, the Career Resource Center sponsors a Wednesday Workshop series free of charge that offers over a dozen different sessions to help your student prepare for volunteer and paid opportunities on and off campus. From writing covers letters and resumes – to readying their interviewing skills – these free workshops are available on a ‘just show up’ basis with no advance sign up required.  The Career Resource Center also sends a weekly electronic newsletter to all students to share events, workshops, scholarships, and anything else that is career related.  To view the newsletter, click here: http://hawksites.newpaltz.edu/careers/

An additional event that is a must for any student thinking about ways they can ‘jump start’ their future is the Networking Fair for Jobs & Internships.  On March 8th, the fair will take place on campus for students interested in looking for a summer job, volunteer opportunity, or to speak to potential employers about what they can do to prepare themselves to be marketable in a given organization or corporation.

UPCOMING EVENTS FOR YOUR STUDENT
Wednesday Workshops

Student Activities & Union Services Spring Programming Series

SPRING COUNSELING CENTER GROUPS

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