September 2016 Newsletter

WHAT’S NEW? SUNY New Paltz Parent Newsletter

MOVING-IN DAY – What it looked like…
Thursday, August 25 turned out to be a beautiful day to welcome your students to New Paltz!  Many staff members and students were on hand to move-in new students and welcome family members to campus.
Click here for a Moving-In Day article & to view photos
moving-in-day-2016

MOVING-IN DAY – What it felt like…..
The cartoon below may make you laugh, but to some extent the experiences depicted in the scenarios are usually true for the majority of parents. Since you dropped your student off for Orientation Part II, Welcome Week, and the first week of classes, they officially crossed the threshold to becoming college students. We hope you were able to get through your own “first week of college” as well. It’s an adjustment for everyone involved, so remember to give yourself permission to ride the waves of feelings that come with an “emptier nest.”  Those feelings are real and you are not alone in feeling them, so commiserate with other people you know who have children in college – it may help you feel better about what you are going through.
letting_go_cartoon

PARENT & FAMILY WEEKEND – September 24-25: RSVP ONLINE TODAY!
We are excited to invite you to a great weekend of events to choose from, and you can enjoy a visit even if you only come up for the day on Saturday!

Our headline entertainment is A Night of Comedy featuring Comic-Hypnotist Frank Santos Jr. and our own student vocal group Absolut A Cappella is the opening act. We have also chartered the Rip Van Winkle just for New Paltz families to enjoy a two–hour boat cruise on the Hudson.
Tickets are selling quickly, so go online and make your reservation today!

The entire invitation and registration form is online at: www.newpaltz.edu/parentsweekend
Please complete a registration form (online or via return mail) even if you do not plan to attend any of the paid events so that we can plan accordingly for the number of visitors coming to campus.  We encourage you to make reservations early as seating is limited at certain eventsOnline reservations are easy to complete and you can pay for paid events with your credit card.

If you choose to mail in your reservation, you can pay by credit card or a check made out to “CAS 8230” and mailed to:
Center for Student Development
SUNY New Paltz
Student Union 301
1 Hawk Drive
New Paltz, NY 12561

Not coming to a paid event? Sign-up anyway and stop by our registration table on the 2nd Floor of the Student Union from 8:30am-2:00pm to enter to win a great gift basket of New Paltz gear!

2016-2017 PARENT HANDBOOK & CALENDAR
The Parent Handbook & Calendar includes information such as important academic dates and deadlines, Midterm and Final Examination schedules, sporting events, and notes on days when classes are not being held due to holiday breaks. You can view the online version of the handbook/calendar on the www.newpaltz.edu/parents page.
2016-2017-parent-handbook-and-calendar-cover-image

A LOOK BACK AT SUMMER ORIENTATION 2016
Student Group Photos & Snapshots
Your students met new friends, gained a Peer Mentor, and created many memories while they attended Orientation this summer.  Click here to enjoy the group photos of Sessions 1-5 as well as some captured candid moments.  You may even find yourself in a photo!
Click here to view Orientation 2016 photos

GETTING HOME FOR FALL BREAK AND THANKSGIVING
Although the residence halls stay open for these holiday weekends, if your student chooses to go home for the four-day “Fall Break” weekend from October 8-11, and/or Thanksgiving Weekend (November 23 – November 27) they can travel by bus right from New Paltz.

ARTICLE OF THE MONTH
“Untying the Apron String: Tips for Letting Go”
Dr. Gweneth M. Lloyd, Director, Psychological Counseling Center

Chances are as you prepare to engage in the actual and final process of sending your child off to college, you will encounter a crescendo in your relationship like no other. It may be one that can be comforting as a few piano notes, loud as the bangs on a drum or as unpredictable rhythms of a musical composition. The struggle between parent and child to “let-go” of each other is a process that begins during labor and delivery and extends through the lifetime of the relationship and sometimes even well beyond that.

In our society it is socially sanctioned that somewhere between ages 18-21, the child-to-adult rites of passage begins. Colleges and universities have come to represent one of the experimental grounds for exploring and experiencing the tasks, activities, rights and responsibilities of becoming an adult. Parents have the breath-holding challenge of standing back and observing their child apply, test, evaluate and select the morals, values and standards that they have been ‘spoon-fed’ over the last seventeen to eighteen years. The physical departure of your child to college will come to represent one of the pivotal points in your relationship status with your child and likewise for your child too. Colleges and universities perceive and manage any enrolled student as an “adult” with all the rights, privileges, responsibilities, benefits and liabilities that such a status holds.

Strategies for working through “letting-go” process: Loosening the apron string
To maximize the growth of your now young “Adult-Child” it is necessary for you to manage your responses and interactions in a manner consistent with their newly acquired adult status. You start doing so by gradually changing your perception of them as a “child,” even when they behave as one. You will need to remind them that they are now young adults and that their decisions and actions carry consequences that may have positive or negative outcomes.

  • It is not unusual for them to call you and demand that you come and pick them up to return home. Transitioning to college can be very anxiety provoking. Talk to them about feelings, fears, and concerns. This is a time to refine your listening skills. Talk less and listen more. Listen with your ears and not your heart.  Be mindful of knowing when to “hold” your opinion, “fold” your opinion or “walk-away” with your opinion.  Partialize the problem by breaking it down and focus on one or two things at a time. Before ending the conversation, have an understanding of what action they will take by the time you talk again. Don’t take control of the situation unless it is life threatening or they have demonstrated that they have done everything possible to manage or solve the problem. It will be necessary for you to remember that in this new status role change, in some situations there will be nothing more you can do. As painful as it may be, you may even discover that the best you can do, is to do nothing. Remember, crisis provides an opportunity for change and change produces and enhances growth.
  • Gradual change in your perception will lead to your young “Adult-Child” assuming greater ownership for their life. This will mean in your role as parent, you are transitioning from commander and chief to “consultant”. You will need to squelch the urge to direct or control. Instead, be a good listener and redirect the decision back to them. Build their self-confidence by empathizing and reminding them of a similar time or situation which they managed by exercising good judgment and problem-solving skills. When they make a decision with an undesirable outcome, again, squelch the urge to say, “I told you so.” Instead, focus your response on talking about what they think can be done differently without commanding or controlling the process.
  • One of the roles of a consultant is to offer options. Try not to be the problem-solver but instead a resource director/facilitator. There is not one problem related to the student’s overall academic, social, psychological and physical success that a corresponding campus resource is not available to assist. For almost every conceivable problem a student may encounter, there is an established campus based resource office professionally staffed to assist the student. Therefore, in your role as a consultant-parent redirect them to the appropriate office for assistance. Keep the resource folder you received during orientation next to your bedside and/or in your work bag. Use it as your reference/resource guide. As you already know, the college website can also be very resourceful.
  • Establish clear and mutual expectations with your young “Adult-Child” about finance management, reasonable academic performance including communication of final grades, your visitation to campus and their visitation home centered on frequency of visits. Address these issues early on as they tend to be the general problem areas. It is not unusual that they may want to come home almost every weekend, especially if they are experiencing home-sickness or is involved in a dating relationship with someone at home. Certainly this behavior has the potential for limiting the kind of campus-based experience that they could have. The downtimes of weekends are opportunities for making connections with room-mates, suite-mates and others across campus. If this is a potential problem, talk about it and have a mutual understanding about the frequency of home visit trips.  You may consider limiting trips home to one weekend per month. As their campus residence is now home turf, resist the urge to do surprise visits. You may be more surprised than you want to be. Therefore tell them that you are considering visiting and give a time/day range. When you visit, resist the commander and chief role of firing one question after the other or commenting on what they look like. Be constructive in your communication especially about room condition, roommates and friends you will meet. Remember, your non-constructive comments can have lasting consequences.
  • Remember, a good consultant is always open, seeking consultation for themselves in order to effectively support and assist. As your “Adult-Child’s” personal consultant, the Psychological Counseling Center welcomes your call/ inquiry for assistance, especially in the psychological/emotional health and safety of your young “adult-child.”
  • Remember, your student lives in a supportive community of peers and countless professionals. Your student is “able” and “capable.”

UPCOMING EVENTS FOR YOUR STUDENT!
As described at Orientation, on an ongoing basis, there are a number of activities for your first-year student to do outside of class.  First-Year Fridays are social events for first-year students where some of the Orientation Leader/Peer Mentors will be present.  To view Part 1 of the Fall 2016  “First-Year Fridays” schedule click the link below:
http://www.newpaltz.edu/studentdevelopment/fyf.html

The “Saturday Movie Night Series” events for the semester can be viewed at the link below:
http://www.newpaltz.edu/studentdevelopment/snl.html

The Office of Student Activities and Union Services also sponsors large scale events promoted campus-wide every month.  In addition to these events, their office also hosts annual programs every year.  To view these programs, click on the link below:
http://www.newpaltz.edu/saus/dept_programs.html

May 2016 Newsletter

WHAT’S NEW?  SUNY New Paltz Parents Newsletter

NEW PALTZ IN THE NEWS
ATTORNEY, ADVOCATE AND BEST-SELLING AUTHOR REGINA CALCATERRA ’88 TO SPEAK AT SUNY NEW PALTZ UNDERGRADUATE COMMENCEMENT
Click here for link
Regina-Calcaterra

MEN’S VOLLEYBALL WINS NCAA CHAMPIONSHIP
Click here for link
Volleyball-champs

BLACK STUDIES APPOINTS TWO NEW FULL-TIME TENURE-TRACK FACULTY
Click here for link
Cruz

RIBBON CUTTING CELEBRATES SOJOURNER TRUTH LIBRARY REOPENING
Click here for link
STL-Ribbon-1024x651

DISTINGUISHED SPEAKER KYNCL ’95 DELIVERS INSIDER’S TAKE ON EVOLVING MEDIA LANDSCAPE
Click here for link
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MINDS AT WORK SHOWCASES UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH, STUDENT-FACULTY COLLABORATION
Click here for link
Research-1024x701

ARTICLE OF THE MONTH
The Big Countdown to The End of Their First Year!
Can you believe a year ago at this time you were planning for High School graduation, and very soon, your student will have already completed a year of college?  That year went fast!  Now it’s time for your student to prepare final papers, get ready for exams, and be reminded to pack up ALL of their belongings (if they live on campus) so that you can (hopefully) show up and move them out without having to pack everything up for them!  Remember- when they have completed their final exams for the semester they must check out with their R.A. who will do a room check, but the residence halls CLOSE on Saturday, May 14th at 10:00am, so your student must vacate with everything by that time.  Even if your student is returning to the same room in the fall, some rooms are painted and halls across campus have maintenance projects so your student cannot leave anything in the building.

Here’s a schedule at-a-glance for the remainder of the semester:
Wednesday, May 4 Thursday, May 5: Study Day/Make-up Class Days
Monday, May 9 – Friday, May 13:
Final Exams
Friday, May 13: End of Spring 2016 semester
Saturday, May 14: Residence Halls close at 10:00am
Wednesday, May 18: Last day for faculty to submit final grades

(Remember: grades are NOT mailed; your student will see them online at my.newpaltz.edu as they are uploaded by each faculty member, course by course)

Fall 2016 Residence Hall Move in Days – Saturday, August 27th and Sunday, August 28th

 

April 2016 Newsletter

WHAT’S NEW?  SUNY New Paltz Parents Newsletter

WILL YOUR STUDENT BE LIVING ON CAMPUS NEXT FALL?
If your student lives on campus and plans to live on campus in the Fall, it’s time to submit the Advance Room Deposit (ARD) of $100.  The latest they can place an ARD is April 4th.  Your student should check their New Paltz e-mail account to find all the instructions for choosing their room.  Payment can be made via their my.newpaltz.edu page by clicking on the “Residence Life” link and selecting the Pay Advance Room Deposit option.

NEW PALTZ IN THE NEWS
MEN’S VOLLEYBALL HITS NUMBER ONE IN NCAA D3
Click here for link
mens-volleyball 2016

AWARDS FOR METAL FACULTY REINFORCE PROGRAM’S REPUTATION AS NATIONAL LEADER
Click here for link
metals_program

ART PROFESSOR INSTALLS MULTIMEDIA EXHIBITION AT WASHINGTON, D.C. MUSEUM
Click here for linkCardillo-Ombu

CAMPUS CONSTRUCTION UPDATE, SPRING 2016
Click here for link
Library-Renovation

ARTICLE OF THE MONTH
Post-Midterm Support: What Can Parents Do?
By Dante Cantú, Direct of the Center for Student Resources & Academic Support

As we enter the final stretch of the spring semester, many parents may be wondering what they can do to ensure that their son or daughter completes their first year of college in strong fashion. In support of this common goal, I would like to offer parents the following suggestions.

Encourage them to gain a clear understanding of their current academic standing. There is no time like the present for a student to gain a clear understanding of their performance to date in each of their courses. This may include a letter grade (or equivalent) and a sense for the weight, or percentage, that is yet to be earned in each course.

For example, a student may find that they currently hold a “B” in a given course based on 55% of the coursework. This would serve to clarify for the student that a significant amount of opportunity exists with, say, 45% of the course grade still to be determined through the remaining course assignments or final projects. An effective, and usually more experienced student, could then use this information to guide their approach toward studying and priority management during this critical time in the semester. Students can obtain this information in a variety of ways, including from reviewing their course syllabi and through direct communication with their professors.

Identify what what’s working (and what’s not). First-year students have the tendency to hold onto unproductive study habits for far too long. I like to provide students with an adaptation of the 50/30/20 budgeting guideline to illustrate this point and to identify areas for improvement.

I would begin by asking a student to group relatively routine activities, such as eating, sleeping, and going to class, within a single category. We’ll call this the fixed category, represented numerically by 50, since it serves as the basis of a student’s everyday existence. And yes, it’s understood that for the average first-year student there’s usually room for improvement within this category. But my preference, at this point in the semester, is to ask students to turn their primary focus of scrutiny upon the next category, represented numerically or proportionally by 30.

This category represents the variety of activities that revolve around their more routine ones, including their social, academic, and other personal commitments. I believe students will find ample opportunity within this category for improved priority management (or, as some might say, behavior management). Quite simply, some activities in this category — whether it’s an approach to studying, or a particularly favored location/time of day to study — have neither fostered nor helped to produce the most solid academic outcomes, and they probably never will. Now’s the time, I tell them, to make these fairly small but significant adjustments. The sooner, the better.

The latter category (20) represents the activities, strategies or resources that the student has yet to try, include or incorporate into their approach. These might be used by, and working for, other students with differing levels of mastery and results. In addition, this category also serves to represent an openness or willingness to change (for the better). It is this type of growth mindset approach, which research increasingly shows can be cultivated, that can support a student’s academic achievement, success, and foster a spirit of continuous improvement that will serve them well beyond college.

Encourage the development of an end-of-semester plan. The process briefly sketched above could serve to support a first-year student in developing an end-of-semester plan that is tailored to their own strengths, disposition, and individual goals. For most students, a strong end-of-semester plan also includes curricular support, in the form of supplemental instruction, tutoring, and/or writing assistance.

To that end, and as part of their end-of-semester plan, please encourage your son or daughter to avail themselves of the curricular support services offered through the Center for Student Resources & Academic Support, in Old Main, room B106, 845-257-3580. The Center offers subject-based tutoring and writing support, as well as a learning strategist to support diverse learners with diagnosed learning disabilities.

The Center’s trained tutoring staff consists of peer tutors, fellow students who have learned to successfully navigate the academic terrain here at the college. Each of them, in their own way, is uniquely positioned to assist first-year students in developing an effective end-of-semester strategy. Moreover, regularly scheduled appointments also provide the necessary peer-based structure to ensure the best possible academic outcomes.

The golden high-five. As a concluding suggestion, I would encourage you to convey your parental pride to your son or daughter as they complete their first year at SUNY New Paltz. The first year of college serves as a rite-of-passage for many, and let’s recall that the traditional college years (ages 18-25) are also a time of profound developmental growth, marked by a complex process of identity- and other skills development processes, as students learn to manage and navigate a host of intellectual, personal, and social demands.

Once again, research in the field continues to demonstrate the vital relationship between parental support and their student’s personal and academic success. Your positive reinforcement could go a long way in supporting their development and success – more than you might currently imagine.
(Parents interested in a list of additional relevant resources can look here and here.)

Dante Cantú is the director of the Center for Student Resources & Academic Support at SUNY New Paltz. Mr. Cantú was recently recognized as an “Outstanding First-Year Advocate” by the National Resource Center for The First-Year Experience and Students in Transition.

DISTINGUISHED SPEAKER SERIES FEATURING ROBERT KYNCL ’95
Thursday, April 28 @ 7:30pm in Lecture Center 100
http://www.newpaltz.edu/speakerseries/
Robert Kyncl - Google Vice President and Global Head of Business

UPCOMING EVENTS
SPRING 2016 NETWORKING FAIR FOR INTERNSHIPS & JOBS
Tuesday, April 5

Noon-4pm, Student Union MPR

“SHARING MY STONES” The Impact of Drinking and Driving
Tuesday, April 5

7pm, Lecture Center 102
Sharing My Stones Poster

CO-CURRICULAR TRANSCRIPT WORKSHOP: http://www.newpaltz.edu/cct/
Wednesday, April 6

12:30pm, Humanities 116

2016 SUNY NEW PALTZ WOMEN’S LEADERSHIP SUMMIT: http://www.newpaltz.edu/summit/women's summit 2016

SATURDAY MOVIE NIGHT SERIES: http://www.newpaltz.edu/studentdevelopment/snl.html
Saturday, April 16
“Star Wars: The Force Awakens”
8:00pm, Lecture Center 102

 

March 2016 Newsletter

WHAT’S NEW?  SUNY New Paltz Parents Newsletter

DEPOSIT DEADLINE FOR ARD (ADVANCE ROOM DEPOSIT) FOR FALL 2016
If your student lives on campus they will receive an e-mail notice from the Housing Coordinator around March 15th to start thinking of whether they want to live on campus their second year. They will also receive very specific information about deadlines for choosing a housing location, whether it be “Same Hall, Same Room”, or moving to another location on campus. In order to secure on-campus housing, students who plan to live on campus will need to pay their $100 ARD before they will be able to sign-up for a room.  The latest they can place an ARD is April 4th. This can be done at any time via their my.newpaltz.edu page by clicking on the “Residence Life” link and selecting the Pay Advance Room Deposit option.

NEW PALTZ IN THE NEWS
NEW PALTZ NAMED TO BEST PUBLIC COLLEGES LIST
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Student Union Atrium

NEW PALTZ WINS 2016 SUNYAC WOMEN’S BASKETBALL CHAMPIONSHIP
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Womens-basketball sunyac 2016

TOWN HALL ENCOURAGES CONVERSATION ON INCLUSION
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Town Hall 2016

SUNY NEW PALTZ RECEIVES FUNDS TO EXPAND EDUCATIONAL OPPORTUNITY PROGRAM BY 100 STUDENTS
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EOP

NEW DIRECTOR OF STUDENT SUPPORT CENTER RECOGNIZED FOR WORK WITH FIRST-YEAR STUDENTS
Click here for link

Dante Cantú, Director of the Center for Student Resources and Academic Support

Dante Cantú, Director of the Center for Student Resources and Academic Support


ARTICLE OF THE MONTH
“Getting ready to have your student home for their (and your) first Spring Break”
by Robin Cohen-La Valle, Dean of Students

[Note: Spring Break takes place in March, with classes ending the evening of Friday, March 18th and resuming on the morning of Monday, March 28th. Most Residence Halls shut down for this break and students must vacate their hall by 10:00am Saturday morning March 19th and can return after 10:00am on Sunday, March 27th. The halls are locked during this period, however students are still encouraged to take valuables with them during their break (e.g. laptops, jewelry, cash, passport, ID’s, medications, etc.]

Next to the winter recess, Spring Break is the longest break of the academic year for college students. When we did an informal survey of New Paltz students, 90% said that they were planning to go home and catch up on sleep, see old friends, do readings they have been assigned, work on term papers and projects, possibly work part-time at an old job, and start applying for summer jobs or internships. As you can see, it is a misconception that most college students get to go away to a warm beach somewhere and bask in the sun.

In the meantime, although you may look forward to seeing their face more, having them around the house full-time will change the pace of what it has been like without them for a semester and a half. So how does that affect the household’s equilibrium? Prepare yourself- It’s no surprise that they will look forward to home cooked meals and time shopping with you. However, they might not be ready for you to tell them when to get home after going out with old friends, since you haven’t been there to give curfews this year. Believe it or not, most likely they probably will not be happy that you expect them to pitch in with chores they never liked and haven’t done in a while. For example- if they live on campus, while at school they had to do their laundry, but it is not uncommon for a student to revert back to expecting that even their own chores will be taken care of by someone else while on Spring Break!

So how can you best prepare?

–  First, have realistic expectations. Anticipating a perfectly smooth, harmonious reunion without any disagreements will set you up for disappointment. If you bickered before, or your student wasn’t very forthcoming when it came to telling you what they were doing and feeling, be ready for the fact that they will have changed dramatically.

–  Have an adult conversation with your student the first day back home. Something like, “I know you are an adult now, so let’s talk about what your plans are for the week, what you’d like from me, and what I hope to expect from you…”

–  Choose select times to ask open ended questions of a stressful nature, as that will avoid you being perceived as if you’re ‘nagging’ them every day. For example, once or twice opening a conversation with: “So tell me what you’re thinking of doing this summer, and how I might help” vs. starting every day with, “When are you going to look for a job already, time’s running out!” will more likely keep communication open. Also, see if an aunt, uncle, or good family friend wants to broach these topics with your student. Sometimes questions coming from someone OTHER than a parent or guardian are not received with defensiveness. [I know my nieces and nephews respond VERY differently when I ask them something, even if their mom has asked them the very same question!]

–  Finally, enjoy the moments you have with them. Take the space you need to do your own thing, expect they will want a little space of their own, and enjoy the time you overlap.


GETTING HOME FOR SPRING BREAK REMINDER

Times for the Classic Trans buses are:
SPRING BREAK
DEPART: Friday, March 18, 2016
Depart campus bus stop at 5:00 pm

RETURN: Sunday, March 27, 2016
return to campus from:
Smithaven Mall 12:00 pm
Exit 49 Park & Ride 12:45 pm
Roosevelt Field Mall 1:30 pm

For other options, you can also visit our “Getting Your Student Home” site at: http://www.newpaltz.edu/current/gettinghome.html

UPCOMING EVENTS
“A VIEW FROM THE BRIDGE” BY ARTHUR MILLER
8:00pm, Thursday, March 10 – Saturday, March 12
2:00pm, Sunday, March 13
$10 SUNY New Paltz Student Tickets
http://www.newpaltz.edu/theatre/productions.html#bridge

 

January/February 2016 Newsletter

WHAT’S NEW? SUNY New Paltz Parents Newsletter

ACADEMIC CALENDAR DATES WHEN CLASSES ARE NOT IN SESSION
Spring Break takes place in March, with classes ending the evening of Friday, March 18th and resuming on the morning of Monday, March 28th.  Most Residence Halls shut down for this break and students must vacate their hall by Saturday morning at 10 a.m. on March 19th and can return after 10 a.m. on Sunday, March 27th. (This DOES NOT include the following 10-month halls: Bouton, Crispell, Deyo, and Gage.) The halls are locked during this period, however students are still encouraged to take valuables with them during their break (e.g. laptops, jewelry, cash, passport, ID’s, medications, etc.)

Note: Classes ARE in session for President’s Day Monday, February 15th.  In April, classes after 3 p.m. Friday, April 22nd are not in session.  

NEW PALTZ IN THE NEWS
SUNY NEW PALTZ 2015 YEAR IN
REVIEW
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2015 Year in Review

LIEUTENANT GOVERNOR VISITS SUNY NEW PALTZ, ANNOUNCES NEW STATEWIDE BROADBAND PLAN
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Lieutenant-Governor-Campus-Visit_74

LIBRARY’S MAIN FLOOR OPENS TO CAMPUS COMMUNITY
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Library-Construction-Update


ARTICLE OF THE MONTH

Leadership Opportunities for Your Student
Beginning in the next few weeks, and throughout every Spring semester, the campus swells with activities that launch application processes for various positions on and off campus. For example, if you attended Orientation in the summer, you are quite familiar with Orientation Leaders/Peer Mentors (OL’s), who work full-time on campus for 8 weeks in the summer and part-time through the following school year. For most of you, your student lives on campus, so you are familiar with Resident Assistants (RA’s) who live on each floor and assist students with issues or requests. There are a myriad of leadership opportunities like these (that will start in the summer or next fall) that your student can begin applying for NOW, including Student Activities Managers, Commuter Assistants, and Admissions Crew.  Wednesday, January 27th features a Student Club and Involvement Fair in the Student Union with over 150 organizations giving out information about how your student can get involved. (See some Informational Meetings listed below for Orientation Leader and Resident Assistant positions below)

In addition, the Career Resource Center sponsors a Wednesday Workshop series free of charge that offers over 10 different sessions to help your student prepare for volunteer and paid opportunities on and off campus. From writing covers letters and resumes – to readying their interviewing skills – these free workshops are available on a ‘just show up’ basis with no advance sign up required.

An additional event that is a MUST for any student thinking about ways they can ‘jump start’ their future is the Networking Fair for Jobs & Internships.  On April 5th, the fair will take place on campus, for students interested in looking for a summer job, volunteer opportunity, or to speak to potential employers about what they can do to prepare themselves to be marketable in a given organization or corporation.

SPRING INFORMATIONAL OPPORTUNITIES
Student Club & Involvement Fair
Wednesday, January 27 @ 2-5 p.m., Student Union Multi-Purpose Room

Resident Assistant Informational Meetings
Wednesday, January 27 @ 9 p.m., Crispell Hall
Thursday, January 28 @ 9 p.m., Bouton Hall
Monday, February 1 @ 9 p.m., Gage Hall

Orientation Leader Informational Meetings
Tuesday, February 16 @ 8 p.m., Student Union 62/63
Wednesday, February 17 @ 11:30 a.m. or 5 p.m., Student Union 418
Thursday, February 18 @ 7 p.m., Student Union 62/63

Wednesday Workshops
Wednesday Workshops - Spring 2016 Design

December 2015 Newsletter

WHAT’S NEW? SUNY New Paltz Parents Newsletter

On behalf of the Division of Student Affairs, we send you our best wishes for a happy and healthy new year!

The December Academic Calendar has some key dates:
December 8 – Last Day of Classes
December 9-10 – Study Day/Make-Up Class Days
December 11 – Common Exam Day (Composition)
December 14-18 – Final Exams (note: does not follow the same schedule as their class schedule)
December 19 – Residence Halls close at 10:00 a.m.

FALL 2015 FINAL EXAMS SCHEDULE
Click here to view your student’s final exams schedule: Fall 2015 Final Exams Week: December 14-18

IMPORTANT INFORMATION FOR SPRING 2016
Residence Halls
All residence halls on campus will re-open on Monday, January 18, 2016 at 10:00 a.m. Students can move back into their room between 10:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m. and 8:30 p.m. – 10:30 p.m. on Monday.  Meal Plans will be activated and Hasbrouck Dining Hall will be open for breakfast.  If your student plans to return to their hall on Tuesday, January 19, they should contact their Residence Director in advance.

First Day of Classes
The official first day of classes will kick-off the spring semester on Wednesday, January 20.

Paying Your Bill
Bill payment arrangements can be done online at your student’s my.newpaltz.edu page. Your bill should be paid by the due date listed on your invoice in order to avoid late charges. If you have questions about your bill, the best way to contact the Office of Student Accounts is to e-mail them at stuacct@newpaltz.edu. Their phone number is (845) 257-3150.

BOOKSTORE TEXTBOOK BUYBACK
Remind your student that they can return their textbook rentals or sell purchased books back for cash at the campus Bookstore. The Bookstore, located in the lower level of the Student Union, will have extended hours during final exams week beginning Monday, December 14 and ending Friday, December 18.

NEW PALTZ IN THE NEWS
NEW PALTZ STUDENT PRODUCTION TEAM WINS FILM 48 COMPETITION
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Film48

HONORING HEROES AT THE VETERANS DAY DINING-IN
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Veterans-Day-Second-Annual-Dinner

2015 BRINGS MAJOR PLASTIC REDUCTION EFFORTS TO CAMPUS
Click here for link
BagFreeNPZ1


ARTICLE OF THE MONTH

A message from the Director of the Counseling Center:
Congratulations! You have survived (along with your son/daughter) the first half of their first year in college. While for most of you it was relatively smooth sailing and for others a seemingly bumpy ride all the way to the end, in the final analysis with you in the background (and sometimes foreground) you made it through. They came home totally tired from the stress of finals. You fed them their favorite home cooked meal and allowed them to slumber. How did you do when it came to interacting during their first winter break home-stay?

Did you ask “did you make the grades?” Most likely one of your top priorities was to find out the academic outcome—namely their final grades. Hopefully you curbed the urge to purge it out of them if they did not voluntarily share their final grades with you. Those who did well—passed all their classes with C and above may be more inclined to disclose than those who were less successful. If you resisted the need to interrogate and remembered to exercise utmost patience and understanding when discussing final grades, you were on target. Being non-judgmental and asking open-ended questions, as well as praising/acknowledging their efforts and their strengths, will go far. For example, “Jay/Jessica, it looks like you did well in some of your classes but were really struggling in the others…..What do you think happened?” A typical response from your son/daughter to this question may be, “…I don’t know.”  Your response then would be, “…well Jay/Jessica it will be helpful for you to think about that so you will try to manage whatever it was that led to these grades.” Remember the first year (especially the first semester) in college can be very overwhelming even for the student who did exceptionally well in high school. Again remember just about everyone here at New Paltz did exceptionally well in high school too. The performance bars are much higher now in addition to the complex social and cultural environment they have to simultaneously navigate.

Did you want to say, “What do you mean I will do better next time?” It’s always good to minimize the opportunity for a big fight over grades. A long drawn out lecture about their performance is not going to accomplish anything after they just barely survived thirteen/fourteen weeks of four to five classes of lectures. Also, probably were feeling both guilt and shame about their performance. They would simply respond either passively or angrily to you. Therefore, stating your concern and letting it go for the time being is the best advice. Sometime early in their second semester, revisit the performance issue with them by again acknowledging their apparent effort and empathizing with their struggle. Example, “…Jay/Jessica, I know you are concerned about your performance, I/we are too. I/we hope you have given some thought to the reasons for your performance and that you have a plan of how to address the difficulties…I/we hope you will speak to your advisor, orientation leader (OL) or peer mentor about how to get the assistance that will help you to be much more successful in the Spring semester.” Again, say your peace and keep it brief.

Responding to changes. You may have noticed a lot of changes about them. Some subtle and some very overt. Change in attitudes, belief, behavior, values and lifestyles. You may even find yourself questioning whether this is really the same person you dropped off to college just about five months ago. Well, if this is true for you, then consider that as evidence that your son/daughter is experiencing the challenges and benefits of the overall college experience. Caution, be careful of your response. If whatever it is about them seems far-out or a bit over the top to you, then simply look them straight in the eye and say “…uhmm, Jay/Jessica that is really interesting.” The goal here is to avoid being unnecessarily critical. Remember some of these changes may be temporary and they will modify and adjust as they go through their developmental processes.

Say what? Asking vs. Telling. Excuse them if they seem not to be as respectful as they were before. Remember they have not had to answer to the tune of “yes/no mom/dad.” For the past five months they have been living primarily in the company of their peers and have developed various special communication patterns. In their newly found independence they have not had to ask for permission or approval to do most things. They have grown used to telling rather than asking and doing just about anything they want to do. Therefore, you will need to talk about how to communicate in a way that is respectful and validating of each other. Example, when Jay/Jessica approaches you and says, “…mom/dad I need the car keys I am going out.” Then you can begin a dialogue by saying, “…Jay/Jessica we need to talk about how we can communicate about our expectations and needs from each other especially when you are home…” If you had a curfew before, then when they visit your home, consider renegotiating the time with them.

What do you mean you are not sure you want to be back at New Paltz? Confusion about returning/staying away. By mid-> January, most students start feeling eager to return to campus. They miss being in the company of their room-mates, suitemates and other friends. Most of all they miss the sense of autonomy and personal freedom. Parents, family and friends, should try not to take this personally. It is not about you, it is about them. Oftentimes, being home feels like compromising their newly found sense of self. College allows them to explore their horizon and express themselves in a validating way. While the prospect of returning to campus seems exciting for most students, there are some students that struggle with the thought of returning. Most students in this category have done reasonably well academically but struggled with a combination of emotional, psychological and social challenges. If this is true for your son/daughter, it is important that you talk to them about it — validate their concerns and encourage them to seek support especially from the counseling center on campus upon their return. You may also contact the counseling center for support in facilitating referral to the center.

Sincerely,
Gweneth M. Lloyd, Director, Psychological Counseling Center, SUNY New Paltz

UPCOMING EVENTS FOR YOUR STUDENT!
CLASS OF 2019’S END OF SEMESTER CELEBRATION
Friday, December 4
Can You Feel the Heat?  Featuring the OL Hot Seat
7-9pm, Student Union MPR
Your student can celebrate the end of his/her first semester with the Orientation Leaders and enjoy free food, raffle prizes, a photo booth, and more!

WELCOME BACK WEEKEND SOCIAL EVENTS BEING PLANNED
The 8th Annual Welcome Back Weekend will be held at the end of the first week of classes (Saturday, January 23 and Sunday, January 24). All first-year students will receive an e-mail in late January listing these upcoming social events.  The SUNY New Paltz Class of 2019 Facebook page will also highlight Welcome Back Weekend activities, as well.

November 2015 Newsletter

WHAT’S NEW? SUNY New Paltz Parent Newsletter

NEW PALTZ IN THE NEWS
INAUGURAL ANYthing CONFERENCE PUTS NEW PALTZ AT THE CENTER OF 3D PRINTING IN THE NORTHEAST
Click here for link
ANYthing- CONFERENCE

DISTINGUISHED SPEAKER DR. NELL IRVIN PAINTER SHARES INSIGHTFUL TALK ON SOJOURNER TRUTH
Click here for link
Dr Nell Painter

NEW-LOOK BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT CONFERENCE TO CELEBRATE 20TH YEAR
Click here for link
BDC- 2015


ARTICLE OF THE MONTH
What Do Fraternities and Sororities Have to Offer?
The Fraternities and Sororities at SUNY New Paltz strive to uphold their founding values of scholarship, service, leadership and brotherhood/sisterhood on a daily basis. Students in our Fraternity and Sorority community gain a wide range of benefits, including achieving successful interpersonal relationships, communication skills, governance representation, community service and volunteerism, and a group camaraderie established between peers locally, regionally and nationally. We have a unique Fraternity and Sorority Life program on campus serving the needs of our diverse student population. About 300 students (4% of the undergraduate population) are actively involved in Fraternities and Sororities. Our members make life-long friends, and appreciate feeling they are part of a family while away from home.

Is My Student Eligible to Join?
First and foremost, it’s important that a student do his/her homework before joining a Fraternity or Sorority. Our campus has twenty-three different organizations to choose from, and with membership comes a lifetime affiliation to the organization. Each chapter’s New Member Education Process is approved by the Office of Student Activities and Union Services to ensure that it is hazing-free and supportive of a student’s academic schedule and coursework. First-year students are eligible to become New Members of a Fraternity or Sorority during their second semester, with 12 credits completed and at least a 2.5 cumulative Grade Point Average. Before your student joins an organization, verify that it is a recognized Fraternity or Sorority on our campus ( www.newpaltz.edu/saus).

What’s the Difference Between Recognized and Unrecognized Organizations?
A “recognized” Fraternity or Sorority is an organization that the college supports and has helped develop and manage. All recognized fraternities and sororities have worked hard to earn their official status. These organizations have the privilege of using college facilities and equipment, sponsoring information tables, posting and hanging flyers, holding meetings and/or programs on campus, having an Advisor, inducting new members who will be recognized by the college, and participating in campus functions such as Meet the Greeks. All of the organizations that are recognized by the college follow our no hazing policy during New Member Education. This policy insures that at no time will a student’s safety and health be at risk. An “unrecognized” organization is one which chooses to exist “off campus,” and is not affiliated with SUNY New Paltz. An unrecognized group does not follow college policies and regulations. These organizations are not permitted to use college facilities, post flyers nor have any of the privileges recognized organizations have earned.

It is important to understand that if a student chooses to become a part of an unrecognized organization, he/she will never be recognized by the college and sometimes by the national board as an official member of that fraternity or sorority. That student will never be able to put his/her fraternity/sorority experience on their Co-Curricular Transcript. Unrecognized organizations are not monitored by the college; students who choose to affiliate may potentially endanger their safety. Therefore, be sure to verify the status of an organization with Student Activities and Unions Services before your student begins a New Member Education Program.

How Can I Get More Information?
Fraternity and Sorority Life at SUNY New Paltz is managed through the Office of Student Activities and Union Services. Our website (www.newpaltz.edu/saus) contains helpful information to acclimate you to our exciting Fraternity and Sorority Life Community. Please feel free to contact the Assistant Director, Emily Bazinet, at bazinete@newpaltz.edu with questions or concerns.


GETTING HOME FOR THANKSGIVING

The residence halls stay open for the holiday weekend, however, many students wish to travel home for the Thanksgiving Break (November 25-November 29).  If needed, your student can travel by bus via Adirondack Trailways or the Classic College Express.


WINTER SESSION 2015-2016: DECEMBER 28 – JANUARY 17

Your student can earn 4 credits in 3 weeks!
First-Year students can get ahead or catch up in one of the 3-week online courses that are available during Winter Session.  Registration begins on November 2.

All classes will be held online using Blackboard. For technical information, please visit the Academic Computing website.

Questions?
E-mail wintersession@newpaltz.edu or call 845-257-2904.
For registration information, visit the registration page.


UPCOMING EVENTS FOR YOUR
STUDENT!
The Office of Student Activities & Union Services
Monday, Nov. 2
Lillian Bustle: Stripping Away Negative Body Image
8pm, Lecture Center 108

Monday, Nov. 9
Andy Stoll: How and Why to Travel the World
8pm, Lecture Center 102

Saturday Movie Night &  Live Entertainment Series: http://www.newpaltz.edu/studentdevelopment/snl.html
Saturday, Nov. 7
“Toy Story 3”
8pm, Lecture Center 102

It’s On Us Sexual Assault Awareness & Prevention Programming
Monday, Nov. 9 – Friday, Nov. 13
To view SUNY New Paltz’s It’s On Us campaign video, click here: https://sites.newpaltz.edu/campusupdate/2014/12/its-on-us/

October 2015 Newsletter

WHAT’S NEW? SUNY New Paltz Parent Newsletter

PARENT & FAMILY WEEKEND- Photo Album
Saturday, September 26, 2015
Click here to view the Parent & Family Weekend Photo Slideshow
Parent & Family Weekend 2015

Congratulations to Patricia A. and her student Rebecca from Fairport, NY for winning the Parent & Family Weekend Raffle Basket!
Raffle Basket Winner- Patricia A. COPY


NEW PALTZ IN THE NEWS

BENJAMIN CENTER RENAMING EVENT HONORS FOUNDER’S LIFETIME OF SERVICE TO THE COLLEGE AND COMMUNITY
Click here for link
Benjamin-Center-Renaming

MEN’S SOCCER GAME WILL HONOR ALUMNI AND VETERANS AND BENEFIT WOUNDED WARRIOR PROJECT
Click here for link
Soccer-1024x565


DISTINGUISHED SPEAKER SERIES

nell_painter
SUNY New Paltz students are admitted FREE with New Paltz I.D.

Thursday, October 15
7:30pm, Lecture Center 100
www.newpaltz.edu/speakerseries


ARTICLE OF THE MONTH

Parents as Partners for Internship and Job Opportunities. Hire New Paltz!
Parents as partners can be a critical resource for assisting us with increasing the marketability of new college graduates.  Pre-professional experiences, especially internships, look great on a resume.  Why are we stressing the importance of parents working with us to expand the number of internship and professional contacts we have at SUNY New Paltz?

Think about the fact that you hope that your son or daughter will have a good variety of opportunities to choose from for pre-professional experiences/internships as well as for post-graduation options.  With parents as our partners, we can increase the number and type of opportunities available to your student as well to all SUNY New Paltz students.  Here are some of the ways you can help SUNY New Paltz students with their career development:

Offer internships
An internship can help a student determine career direction, and it provides valuable real-world experience. Is there an established internship program at your company/organization? Even if your employer doesn’t currently have a formal internship program, is there the possibility of employing a student as an intern?
Your organization can post and internship at https://newpaltz-csm.symplicity.com/
For more information about internships, please visit www.newpaltz.edu/careers/internships.html

Post jobs
If your organization has entry level positions for college graduates, consider posting on HawkHire at  https://newpaltz-csm.symplicity.com/. Posting on HawkHire is free and the postings are accessible only to SUNY New Paltz students and Alumni- A great way to attract talent.

Share your experience
We encourage students to conduct informational interviews with professionals working in their fields of interest as a way to research occupations and organizations. We host dozens of career events and programs each year from ‘Internship/Job Fairs’ to ‘Career Panels’ to ‘Experts from the Field’ Skype sessions and even bring students to companies for site visits. If you have special interests and would like to discuss how you might contribute, please complete this form at http://www.newpaltz.edu/careers/partners.html and a staff member from the Career Resource Center will contact you.

If you know anyone interested in hiring SUNY New Paltz students as interns or for Full-time entry level positions, please have them contact the Career Resource Center at (845-257-3265), or email at careers@newpaltz.edu  or they can post the opportunity on https://newpaltz-csm.symplicity.com/. Thank you for your continued interest in and support of SUNY New Paltz Students.

Thank you for your continued interest in and support of SUNY New Paltz Students.
Dawn McCaw, M Ed.
Acting Director
Career Resource Center


GETTING HOME FOR FALL BREAK REMINDER
Although the residence halls stay open for the “Fall Break” weekend, your student may choose to go home for the four-day break from October 10-13 and can travel by bus right from New Paltz.

  • Adirondack Trailways Bus tickets are sold in the Office of Student Activities and Union Services in Student Union 211. For details go to:
    http://www.newpaltz.edu/sub/trailways.html
  • Classic College Express runs express charter buses from campus to three stops: Roosevelt Field, the Exit 49 Park & Ride on the LIE, and Smithaven Mall. This bus service will cancel the SUNY New Paltz pick-up and drop-off if not enough students reserve a seat in advance.  You can reserve tickets from New Paltz and back to New Paltz online at: http://www.classictrans.com/CollegeEx/co_npal1.html

Times for the Classic Trans buses are:
FALL BREAK
DEPART: Friday, October 19, 2015
Depart campus bus stop at 5:00pm

RETURN: Tuesday, October 13, 2015
return to campus from:
Smithaven Mall 12:00pm
Exit 49 Park & Ride 12:45pm
Roosevelt Field Mall 1:30pm

For other options, you can also visit our “Getting Your Student Home” site at: http://www.newpaltz.edu/current/gettinghome.html


UPCOMING EVENTS FOR YOUR STUDENT!
First-Year Fridays
:
Friday, Oct. 16
RHSA’s Spirit Weekend Kick-Off Event
BUZZ Karaoke at 7:30pm, Student Union 100 South

Saturday Movie Night &  Live Entertainment Series: http://www.newpaltz.edu/studentdevelopment/snl.html
Saturday, Oct. 17
“Ant Mant”
8pm, Lecture Center 102

The Office of Student Activities & Union Services
Wednesday, Oct. 14
Meditation Program
7-9pm, Student Union 100  North

Saturday, Oct. 17
Cupcake Wars
2-4pm, Student Union 100 North


September 2015 Newsletter

WHAT’S NEW? SUNY New Paltz Parent Newsletter

MOVING IN DAY – What it looked like…
Thursday, August 20 turned out to be a beautiful day to welcome your students to New Paltz!  President Christian was on hand to move-in new students and many staff members and students across the campus were part of our welcome crew as well.
Move In Day 2015

Click here for a Moving In Day article & photo slideshow


MOVING IN DAY – What it felt like…..
The cartoon below may make you laugh, but to some extent the experiences depicted in the scenarios are usually true for the majority of parents. Since you dropped your student off for Orientation Part II, Welcome Week, and the first week of classes, they officially crossed the threshold to becoming college students. We hope you were able to get through your own “first week of college” as well. It’s an adjustment for everyone involved, so remember to give yourself permission to ride the waves of feelings that come with an “emptier nest.”  Those feelings are real and you are not alone in feeling them, so commiserate with other people you know who have children in college – it may help you feel better about what you are going through.

letting_go_cartoon


PARENT & FAMILY WEEKEND – September 26-27: RSVP ONLINE TODAY!

In the next week, you’ll be receiving your printed invitation to Parent & Family Weekend in the mail.  This is a great weekend of events to choose from, and you can enjoy a visit even if you only come up for the day on Saturday!

Our headline entertainment is A Night of Comedy with “Stand Up Dads” and our own student vocal group Absolute A Cappella is the opening act. We have also chartered the Rip Van Winkle just for New Paltz families to enjoy a two–hour boat cruise on the Hudson.
Tickets for both will be selling quickly, so go online and make your reservation today!

The entire invitation and registration form is online at: www.newpaltz.edu/parentsweekend
Please complete a registration form (online or via return mail) even if you do not plan to attend any of the paid events so that we can plan accordingly for the number of visitors coming to campus.  We encourage you to make reservations early as seating is limited at certain events.  ONLINE reservations are easy to complete and you can pay for paid events with your credit card.

If you choose to MAIL in your reservation, you can pay by credit card or a check made out to “CAS 8230” and mailed to:
Center for Student Development
SUNY New Paltz
Student Union 301
1 Hawk Drive
New Paltz, NY 12561

NOT coming to a paid event? Sign-up anyway and stop by our registration table on the 2nd Floor of the Student Union from 9:30am-3:00pm to enter to win a great gift basket of New Paltz gear!

Raffle Winner Family


2015-2016 PARENT HANDBOOK & CALENDAR

The Parent Handbook & Calendar includes information such as important academic dates and deadlines, Midterm and Final Examination schedules, sporting events, and notes on days when classes are not being held due to holiday breaks.  You can view the online version of the handbook/calendar on the www.newpaltz.edu/parents page.
Parent Calendar & Handbook 2015-2016

A LOOK BACK AT SUMMER ORIENTATION 2015
Student Group Photos & Snapshots
Your students met new friends, gained a Peer Mentor, and created many memories while they attended Orientation this summer.  Click here to enjoy the group photos of Sessions 1-5 as well as some captured candid moments.  You may even find yourself in a photo!
Click here to view Orientation 2015 photos

STUDENTS APPLYING FOR WORK STUDY POSITIONS
Beginning August 14, Work Study positions were made available online.  Students who have been awarded Work Study in their Financial Aid package received an e-mail with instructions on how to apply for jobs including helpful interview information.  A Work Study award is not a guarantee of a job and positions are limited.  Students are also limited to only one Work Study position. If your student received Work Study, please encourage him or her to read the hiring process information in their e-mail and apply online.

GETTING HOME FOR FALL BREAK AND THANKSGIVING
Although the residence halls stay open for these holiday weekends, if your student chooses to go home for the four-day “Fall Break” weekend from October 10-13, and/or Thanksgiving Weekend (November 25-November 29) they can travel by bus right from New Paltz.

ARTICLE OF THE MONTH
Re-read: “Untying the Apron String: Tips for Letting Go”
Parents often find the first few months challenging in terms of how much ‘letting go’ they need to do. Dr. Gweneth M. Lloyd, Director of our Psychological Counseling Center, wrote this article, which can be found on page 4 of your Parent Handbook, or can be found in the online calendar/handbook on page 22 of this PDF link: http://www.newpaltz.edu/parents/full_calendar_15_16.pdf

UPCOMING EVENTS FOR YOUR STUDENT!
As described at Orientation, on an ongoing basis, there are a number of activities for your first-year student to do outside of class.  First-Year Fridays are social events for first-year students where some of the Orientation Leader/Peer Mentors will be present.  To view Part 1 of the Fall 2015  “First-Year Fridays” schedule click the link below:
http://www.newpaltz.edu/studentdevelopment/fyf.html

The “Saturday Movie Night Series” events for the semester can be viewed at the link below:
http://www.newpaltz.edu/studentdevelopment/snl.html

The Office of Student Activities and Union Services also sponsors large scale events promoted campus-wide every month.  In addition to these events, their office also hosts annual programs every year.  To view these programs, click on the link below:
http://www.newpaltz.edu/saus/dept_programs.html

Parents! Although they have been notified about all of these events, especially encourage your student to attend the upcoming Club and Involvement Fair on Wednesday, September 2 from 2:00pm-5:00pm on the Student Union Concourse (rain location- Student Union 2nd Floor Multi-Purpose Room)

May 2015 Newsletter

WHAT’S NEW?  SUNY New Paltz Parents Newsletter

NEW PALTZ IN THE NEWS
SUNY NEW PALTZ TO CELEBRATE COMMENCEMENT

Click here for link
Commencement-2014-photo-1024x683

SCHOLARSHIP SUPPORT ALLOWS STUDENTS TO REALIZE THEIR FULL POTENTIAL
Click here for link
Scholarship Reception_89

NEW INTERACTIVE MAP BRINGS CAMPUS TREES TO YOUR DESKTOP
Click here for link
MapStill

ARTICLE OF THE MONTH
The Big Countdown to The End of Their First Year!
Can you believe a year ago at this time you were planning for High School graduation, and very soon, your student will have already completed a year of college? Whew, that year went fast! Now it’s time for them to prepare final papers, get ready for exams, and be reminded to pack up ALL of their belongings (if they live on campus) so that you can (hopefully) show up and move them out without having to pack everything up for them! Remember- when they have completed their final exams for the semester they must check out with their R.A. who will do a room check, but the residence halls CLOSE on Saturday, May 16th at 10:00am, so your student must vacate with everything by that time. Even if they are returning to the same room in the fall, some rooms are painted and halls across campus have maintenance projects, so your student cannot leave anything in the building.

Here’s a bird’s eye view of what your student will be going through at New Paltz over the next week:
Monday, May 11 – Thursday, May 15: Final Exams
Friday, May 15: End of Spring 2015 semester
Saturday, May 16: Residence Halls close at 10:00am
Tuesday, May 19: Last day for faculty to submit final grades

(Remember: grades are NOT mailed; your student will see them online at my.newpaltz.edu as they are uploaded by each faculty member, course by course)

Fall 2015 Residence Hall Move in Days – Saturday, August 22nd and Sunday, August 23rd

Class of 2018’s End of First-Year Celebration
Over 280 of your students attended the 7th Annual End of First-Year Celebration on Sunday, May 3!  For the first time ever, the event was planned with the help of a First-Year Intern and was deemed a success by Hugo the Hawk himself!
Hugo Instagram Board
2015 End of First-Year Celebration Poster- Email