Category Archives: The Writing Process

The Writing Process: Lesson 1: Understanding the Rhetorical Situation: Handouts

button_overview button_lessons_orange button_resources button_glossary
PowerPoint Handouts Activities Lesson Resources

 Handout I: Understanding the Four Major Purposes for Writing

Purpose Handout Photo

Click here to download/open the Four Major Purposes for Writing Handout.

Handout II: Understanding Your Audience

Understanding Your Audience Handout Photo

Click here to download/open the Understanding Your Audience Handout.

Handout III: Genre, Media, and Special Requirements

Genre Media and Special Requirements Photo

Click here to download/open the Genre, Media, Context, and Special Requirements Handout.

The Writing Process: Lesson 1: Understanding the Rhetorical Situation

button_overview button_lessons_orange button_resources button_glossary
PowerPoint Handouts Activities Lesson Resources

 Resources in This Lesson:

Note: These resources are found under the links at the top of the page.

OWL Slide Share PHOTOThe PowerPoint Slide Share explores what elements make up the rhetorical situation and why identifying and considering the rhetorical situation is an essential first step to writing any text.

 

Handout 1 PhotoThe handouts can be used to supplement the Slide Share presentation.

Activity 1 PhotoThe activities can be assigned as small group work or individual assignments.

The Lesson Resources link will take you to websites that have online exercises as well as additional instructional material.

 

The Writing Process: Lesson 6: Editing and Finishing the Essay: Lesson Resources

button_overview button_lessons_orange button_resources button_glossary
Video Handouts Activities Lesson Resources

owl_logoThe “Mechanics” webpage on the OWL (Purdue) website provides a list of common grammatical problems for the student to avoid. The students can click on a grammatical issue, like “fragments,” and find example to help correct their errors.

harvard_logo2_sizedThe Harvard College Writing Center provides a list of the stages of writing an essay. Students can click on the step they want to learn, such as “Editing the Essay, Part One” or “Editing the Essay, Part Two,” to learn more about that step of the process. For instance, “Editing the Essay, Part One” includes a section that asks students to eliminate “inappropriately elevated language,” with examples to help the student identify the problem.  For more practice with mechanics, the Harvard site also offers a page called “Tips on Grammar, Punctuation and Style.”

The Writing Process: Lesson 5: Revising: Resources

button_overview button_lessons_orange button_resources button_glossary
Video Handouts Activities Lesson Resources

brooklyn_college_logo_sizedThis article, “Revising Your Paper,” asks students a series of questions to lead them through the revision process and asks them to consider it carefully and as a whole.  The article ends with links to other websites that are useful for assisting students with the writing process.

emory_university_sizedThis article, “Revising Your Essay,” from the Emory University Writing Center defines “revision” and explains why it is important before asking students a series of questions to hone their revision process.  This set of questions differs from the ones listed on the CUNY website above, so students may want to use both or incorporate elements from both when practicing revision.  Instructors should be aware that some of the revision questions may require some additional explanation; for instance, “ what parts need to be cut out?” may not be easily determined by the student alone so additional discussions about relevance and the need to focus continually on main ideas may be necessary.

harvard_logo2_sizedThe Harvard College Writing Center provides numerous resources for student writers including a section on Strategies for Essay Writing.  Within this section is a specific article on “Revising the Draft” which includes both a “how to” section and an example showing the revision process.