Lecture on Ethics as a “Human Project”

The Philosophy Department, the Evolutionary Studies Program, the EvoS Club, and the NorthEastern Evolutionary Psychology Society present “Ethics as a Human Project,” a talk by Dr. Philip Kitcher, on Thursday, April 10, 4:45 PM in Lecture Center 100.

What makes ways of living good or bad, actions right or wrong? Can we make objective judgments about what is valuable? Western philosophy has struggled with these questions. This lecture will suggest that we can liberate ourselves from familiar difficulties in answering them if we treat ethical practice as an evolving project, with deep roots in our human (and pre-human) past.

Philip Kitcher is the John Dewey Professor of Philosophy at Columbia University and a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He studied at Cambridge and at Princeton, where he obtained a PhD in the history and philosophy of science. He has taught at Vassar College, the University of Vermont, the University of Minnesota, and the University of California at San Diego, and he is a past president of the American Philosophical Association. The author of over a dozen books, Dr. Kitcher has written about philosophy of mathematics and philosophy of biology as well as ethical and political constraints on scientific research. His recent work focuses on the relation between science and religion, and evolution and ethics. He has also written on the work of writers James Joyce and Thomas Mann and the music of Richard Wagner.

We gratefully acknowledge the generous support of the Provost’s Office and Campus Auxiliary Services.

LA&S Summer Internship Scholarships

The College of Liberal Arts and Sciences is pleased to announce scholarships to support low-paying or unpaid summer internships for students.  For summer 2014 we will offer two or three $1,000 awards.  This program is supported by generous contributions from SUNY New Paltz parents, alumni, and friends to the LA&S Dean’s Fund.

These are merit-based awards that take into account the student’s GPA, the quality of the internship, the relevance of the internship to the student’s academic major and educational goals, and the relevance of the internship to the student’s future career.

Guidelines:

  • Applicants should be majors in a department or program within the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences.
  • Applicants should have a 3.3 or higher cumulative G.P.A.
  • Preference will be given to students in their junior year; seniors who will graduate in May or August 2014 are not eligible for this award.
  • The internship cannot be with a business or organization run by a family member, relative, or close family friend.

To apply, students should submit the following:

  • A 300-500 word description of the internship and its relation to the student’s academic major, educational goals, and career plans
  • A resume
  • An academic transcript with cumulative G.P.A.
  • Two letters of recommendation from faculty

Applications should be sent to the Dean of the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, JFT 614.  Deadline for applications is May 7, 2014.  Awards will be announced on May 15, 2014.

Free Hearing Test for Students, Faculty & Staff

DSC03877Hearing loss is a very common problem that can significantly affect an individual’s ability to communicate. The Speech Language and Hearing Center (SLHC) here on campus provides full audiological evaluations at no cost for students, faculty and staff.  The evaluation takes approximately one hour and will be performed by a nationally and state certified audiologist. If you are interested, please call 257-3600 to make an appointment.

Statistics on Hearing Loss:

  • About 20 percent of adults in the United States, 48 million, report some degree of hearing loss.
  • 60 percent of the people with hearing loss are either in the work force or in educational settings.
  • At age 65, one out of three people has a hearing loss.
  • About 2-3 of every 1,000 children are hard of hearing or deaf
  • Estimated that 30 school children per 1,000 have a hearing loss.

Source: John Hopkins Medicine

Lecture on the Science of Diet and Human Evolution

Interested in why you eat what you eat? Don’t miss a special talk, entitled “From Ardipithecus to Agriculture: The Science of Diet and Human Evolution,”  by New Paltz’s own Dr. Ken Nystrom of Anthropology and Evolutionary Studies.  The talk will be held Monday, March 10 from 5:30-7 p.m. in Lecture Center 102.

With increased public awareness of the nature of the industrialized food complex and the health consequences associated with a typical ‘westernized’ diet, there has been a considerable amount of discussion in the popular media regarding the diet of our ancestors, centered principally around the question of what we have evolved to eat. In this talk, Nystrom will discuss the methods that scientists use to reconstruct diet in our earliest hominin ancestors (from approx. 5 to 2 million years ago), focusing principally on direct forms of evidence such as biogeochemical analyses and dental microwear. He will then move on to discuss the biological consequences of the shift from food foraging to food producing, a process that began in the Near East approximately 12,000 years ago. Here the conversation will shift to how biological anthropologists document changes in health and fertility associated with this change in subsistence strategy.

A reception will follow.